vorticism


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vor·ti·cism

 (vôr′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
A short-lived English movement in art and literature that arose in 1914 and was heavily influenced by cubism and futurism.

vorticism

(ˈvɔːtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) an art movement in England initiated in 1913 by Wyndham Lewis combining the techniques of cubism with the concern for the problems of the machine age evinced in futurism
[C20: referring to the "vortices" of modern life on which the movement was based]
ˈvorticist n

Vorticism

an art movement in England in 1914-15 stimulated by Futurism and by the idea that all artistic creation must begin in a state of strong emotion; its products, intended to establish a form characteristic of the industrial age, tend to use angular, machinelike shapes. — Vorticist, n.
See also: Art
Translations

vorticism

n (Art) → Vortizismus m
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References in periodicals archive ?
The period of research comprises the years before and during the First World War, and, in concrete, the visual image of the female form represented by suffrage campaigns, advertisements, recruiting soldiers and support staff related to the war, as well as Modernist art movements like art nouveau, cubism, vorticism and symbolism--including the ways in which women pictorially represented themselves during that period.
Hakutani dwells on the Japanese haiku's depiction of nature rather than emotion and treats in considerable detail parallels between some of Pound's poems, especially "In a Station of the Metro," and haikus by Fujiwara Sadaiye, Matsuo Basho, and Arakida Moritake (the last of whom is mentioned by Pound in "Vorticism").
(1) Critics have discussed Evelyn Waugh's satirical portrayal of the unruly and flippant group, heavily influenced by avant-garde movements such as Futurism and Vorticism and the attack on Britain's conventional value system during the inter-war era.
Nonetheless, and despite his distrust of aesthetics, Eliot was happy to take a determined position in the key aesthetic battle of the period during and after the First World War, between Vorticism and Futurism.
Her present research interest is the evolution of Wyndham Lewis's art theory from the birth of Vorticism up to the 1940s, and her current work draws from Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology as the philosophical framework for a re-reading of Lewis's artistic practice.
Stylistic and figurai elements from Vorticism and Cubism may well have influenced other paintings, notably "Christ Receives the Cross" and "St.
They were figurative works in the David Bomberg style of Vorticism. Bowen, who was kind but didn't mince words, told the artist that he wouldn't get anywhere with those canvases--they represented the past, and he should go away and invent something that no one else had done.
The 10 essays in this volume explore the impact on Canadian vorticism in the writings of Lewis, Marshall McLuhan, Sheila Watson, and Wilfred Watson.
Herbert Cohen and the Jewish Educational Aid Society, the order of the day was for experimental styles of Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Fauvism, and Vorticism. Rosenberg was not satisfied to wholly take up any of these styles.
I would not refer here to the details of the querelle between Marinetti's Avant-garde and the Vorticist movement after the publication of the English Futurist manifesto, Vital English Art, in the June 1914 edition of The Observer, but I would like to quote Pound directly from his lecture Vorticism, delivered in 1914 at the Rebel Art Centre.
the On 10 Bubble; 9 Garlic; 8 Lewis; Carl 7 Norway; 6 Sadat; Anwar 5 Legumes; 4 Fisher; Geoffrey 3 Vorticism; 2 Antimony; 1 ANSWERS: