vote-loser

vote-loser

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) informal an unpopular action that has the possibility of deterring voters from voting for a particular person or party
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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"Tory arrogance and inflexibility during the election campaign meant that police cuts were undoubtedly another vote-loser. So what an irony it is that the Tories have now managed to find one billion from their magic money tree for their grubby deal with the DUP" - Labour MP Lucy Powell.
Strong and stable it is not" Lord (David) Steel, former Liberal leader, attacks Prime Minister Theresa May's deal with the Democratic Unionist Party "Tory arrogance and inflexibility during the election campaign meant that police cuts were undoubtedly another vote-loser. So what an irony it is that the Tories have now managed to find one billion from their magic money tree for their grubby deal with the DUP" Labour MP Lucy Powell "In Tooting, there are schools where children have even had to clean their own classrooms because they have not been able to provide cleaning staff.
William Hague, Michael Howard and Iain Duncan Smith found hostility to Europe was a vote-loser, and David Cameron was determined to "park" the issue for five years.
The SNP were, of course, once keen supporters of the euro for an independent Scotland but moved sideways to the pound as it became clear the euro is a vote-loser.
Mr Blair's early period as Labour leader was defined by his decision to drop Clause 4 of the party constitution - the promise to nationalise industries, widely seen as a vote-loser.
Throwing pebbles at any caste, community or gender is a vote-loser. India still loves a preacher, as the epidemic of religious channels on television would indicate, but it has no time for the bully.
I was afraid that Sir Liam's proposals would gain the sympathy of a government largely made up of dour sons of the manse and humourless, bossy hockey mistresses, but evidently they still know a sure-fire vote-loser when they see it and have greeted his suggestion with a marked lack of enthusiasm.
In the past, however, it has certainly not been a vote-loser for American Presidents to own up to a liking for the odd tipple.
If this is confirmed, the Labour Party fear this will be a major vote-loser for their Swansea Assembly Members.
Or they might also think that clamping down on so many people's favourite leisure time vice might be seen in some quarters as a major vote-loser - even though the perils of smoking are also seen in many quarters as a major voter loser, too.
And all too often its activists have failed the test, their bickering and loony tunes making the event a massive vote-loser.