voting


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Related to voting: Voting rights, Voting Rights Act of 1965

vote

 (vōt)
n.
1.
a. A formal expression of preference for a candidate for office or for a proposed resolution of an issue: Let's decide the matter by vote.
b. The act of voting: It took several votes to decide the matter.
c. A means by which such a preference is made known, such as a raised hand or a marked ballot: looked around the room and counted the votes in favor.
2. The number of votes cast in an election or to resolve an issue: a heavy vote in favor of the bill.
3. A group of voters alike in some way: the African-American vote; the rural vote.
4. The result of an election or referendum: The measure was defeated in a resounding negative vote.
5. The right to participate as a voter; suffrage: when the nation gave the vote to women.
v. vot·ed, vot·ing, votes
v.intr.
1. To express one's preference for a candidate or for a proposed resolution of an issue; cast a vote: voting against the measure.
2. To express a choice or an opinion: The children voted unanimously by jumping up and down.
v.tr.
1. To express one's preference for by vote: voted the straight Republican ticket.
2. To decide the disposition of by vote, as by electing or defeating: vote in a new mayor; voted out their representative; vote down the amendment.
3. To bring into existence or make available by vote: vote new funds for a program.
4. To be guided by in voting: vote one's conscience.
5. To declare or pronounce by general consent: voted the play a success.
6. Informal To state as a preference or opinion: I vote we eat out tonight.
Idiom:
vote with (one's) feet Informal
To indicate a preference or an opinion by leaving or entering a particular locale: "If older cities are allowed to decay and contract, can citizens who vote with their feet ... hope to find better conditions anywhere else?" (Melinda Beck).

[Middle English, vow, from Latin vōtum, from neuter past participle of vovēre, to vow.]

vot′a·ble, vote′a·ble adj.

voting

(ˈvəʊtɪŋ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the action or process of indicating choice, opinion, or will on a question, such as the choosing of a candidate, by or as if by some recognized means, such as a ballot
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.voting - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternativevoting - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternative; "there were only 17 votes in favor of the motion"; "they allowed just one vote per person"
selection, choice, option, pick - the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick"
block vote - a vote proportional in magnitude to the number of people that a delegate represents
secret ballot - a vote in which each person's choice is secret but the totaled votes are public
split ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for candidates from more than one party
straight ticket - a ballot cast by a voter who votes for all the candidates of one party
multiple voting - the act of voting in more than one place by the same person at the same election (illegal in U.S.)
casting vote - the deciding vote cast by the presiding officer to resolve a tie
veto - a vote that blocks a decision
write-in - a vote cast by writing in the name of a candidate who is not listed on the ballot
Translations
hlasování

voting

[ˈvəʊtɪŋ]
A. Nvotación f
B. CPD voting booth Ncabina f electoral
voting machine N (US) → máquina f de votar
voting paper Npapeleta f de votación
voting pattern Ntendencia f de la votación
voting power Npotencia f electoral
voting right Nderecho m a voto
voting share Nacción f con derecho a voto
voting slip N = voting paper

voting

[ˈvəʊtɪŋ] nscrutin mvoting paper n (British)bulletin m de votevoting precinct n (US)circonscription f électoralevoting rights npldroit m de votevoting share naction f avec droit de vote

voting

nWahl f; which way is the voting going?welchen Verlauf nimmt die Wahl?; a system of votingein Wahlsystem nt; to analyze the votingdas Wahlergebnis analysieren; voting was heavydie Wahlbeteiligung war hoch; light votinggeringe Wahlbeteiligung

voting

:
voting age
nWahlalter nt
voting booth
nWahlkabine f
voting machine
n (US) → Wahlmaschine f
voting paper
nStimmzettel m
voting power
n (= right to vote)Stimmberechtigung f, → Stimmrecht nt; (power of a certain group) → Wahlstärke f
voting precinct
n (US Pol) → Wahlbezirk m
voting right
nStimmrecht nt

voting

[ˈvəʊtɪŋ] nvotazione f, voto
References in classic literature ?
All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or backgammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it.
But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively.
He had become a citizen, but he despised democracy, and achieved a hardy consistency only by voting with the pro-slavery party upon all measures friendly to the institution which he considered the scandal and reproach of the American name.
He said things that no doctor should say to another, but which a politician may well say, and has often said, to another politician--things which cannot bear repeating, if, for no other reason, because they are too humiliating and too little conducive to pride for the average American citizen to know; things of the inside, secret governments of imperial municipalities which the average American citizen, voting free as a king at the polls, fondly thinks he manages; things which are, on rare occasion, partly unburied and promptly reburied in the tomes of reports of Lexow Committees and Federal Commissions.
I explained that reform might increase the number of British citizens who had the right of voting at elections for parliament.
One who enjoys the sacred privilege of voting for the man
Its voting strength in the United States in 1888 was 2068; in 1902, 127,713; in 1904, 435,040; in
The first Reform Bill, of 1832, forced on Parliament by popular pressure, extended the right of voting to men of the 'middle class,' and the subsequent bills of 1867 and 1885 made it universal for men.
You've heard of the Pusey horn, which King Canute gave to the Puseys of that day, and which the gallant old squire, lately gone to his rest (whom Berkshire freeholders turned out of last Parliament, to their eternal disgrace, for voting according to his conscience), used to bring out on high days, holidays, and bonfire nights.
You said rights," said Sergey Ivanovitch, waiting till Pestsov had finished, "meaning the right of sitting on juries, of voting, of presiding at official meetings, the right of entering the civil service, of sitting in parliament.
Much nearer sixty years of age than fifty, with a flowing outline of stomach, and horizontal creases in his waistcoat; reputed to be rich; voting at elections in the strictly respectable interest; morally satisfied that nothing but he himself has grown since he was a baby; how can dunder-headed Mr.
James Harthouse in the meantime on a round of visits to the voting and interesting notabilities of Coketown and its vicinity.