vouch


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vouch

 (vouch)
v. vouched, vouch·ing, vouch·es
v.intr.
1. To give personal assurances or a guarantee: vouch for an old friend's trustworthiness.
2. To constitute supporting evidence; give substantiation: a candidate whose strong record vouches for her ability.
v.tr. Archaic
1. To substantiate by supplying evidence; prove: "When any particular matter of fact is vouched by the concurrent testimony of unsuspected witnesses, there our assent is also unavoidable" (John Locke).
2. Law To summon (someone) as a witness to give warranty of title.
3. To refer to (an authority, for example) in support or corroboration; cite.
4. To assert; declare.
n. Obsolete
A declaration of opinion; an assertion.

[Middle English vouchen, to summon to court, warrant, from Anglo-Norman voucher, probably from Vulgar Latin *voticāre, alteration of Latin vocitāre, frequentative of vocāre, to call; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

vouch

(vaʊtʃ)
vb
1. (usually foll by: for) to give personal assurance; guarantee: I'll vouch for his safety.
2. (when: tr, usually takes a clause as object; when intr, usually foll by for) to furnish supporting evidence (for) or function as proof (of)
3. (Law) (tr) English legal history to summon (a person who had warranted title to land) to defend that title or give up land of equal value
4. (tr) archaic to cite (authors, principles, etc) in support of something
5. (tr) obsolete to assert
n
obsolete the act of vouching; assertion or allegation
[C14: from Old French vocher to summon, ultimately from Latin vocāre to call]

vouch

(vaʊtʃ)
v.i.
1. to provide proof, supporting evidence, or assurance (usu. fol. by for): to vouch for someone's integrity.
2. to give a guarantee or act as surety or sponsor; take responsibility (usu. fol. by for).
v.t.
3. to sustain or uphold by or as if by practical proof or demonstration.
4. to cite (an authority, fact, etc.) in support or justification.
5. (formerly) to call or summon into court to make good a warranty of title.
6. Archaic.
a. to attest or warrant.
b. to support or authenticate with vouchers.
c. to declare; assert.
n. Obs.
7. an act of vouching; assertion or attestation.
[1275–1325; < Middle French vo(u)cher, Old French avochier < Latin advocāre; see advocate]

vouch


Past participle: vouched
Gerund: vouching

Imperative
vouch
vouch
Present
I vouch
you vouch
he/she/it vouches
we vouch
you vouch
they vouch
Preterite
I vouched
you vouched
he/she/it vouched
we vouched
you vouched
they vouched
Present Continuous
I am vouching
you are vouching
he/she/it is vouching
we are vouching
you are vouching
they are vouching
Present Perfect
I have vouched
you have vouched
he/she/it has vouched
we have vouched
you have vouched
they have vouched
Past Continuous
I was vouching
you were vouching
he/she/it was vouching
we were vouching
you were vouching
they were vouching
Past Perfect
I had vouched
you had vouched
he/she/it had vouched
we had vouched
you had vouched
they had vouched
Future
I will vouch
you will vouch
he/she/it will vouch
we will vouch
you will vouch
they will vouch
Future Perfect
I will have vouched
you will have vouched
he/she/it will have vouched
we will have vouched
you will have vouched
they will have vouched
Future Continuous
I will be vouching
you will be vouching
he/she/it will be vouching
we will be vouching
you will be vouching
they will be vouching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been vouching
you have been vouching
he/she/it has been vouching
we have been vouching
you have been vouching
they have been vouching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been vouching
you will have been vouching
he/she/it will have been vouching
we will have been vouching
you will have been vouching
they will have been vouching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been vouching
you had been vouching
he/she/it had been vouching
we had been vouching
you had been vouching
they had been vouching
Conditional
I would vouch
you would vouch
he/she/it would vouch
we would vouch
you would vouch
they would vouch
Past Conditional
I would have vouched
you would have vouched
he/she/it would have vouched
we would have vouched
you would have vouched
they would have vouched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.vouch - give personal assurancevouch - give personal assurance; guarantee; "Will he vouch for me?"
take the stand, testify, bear witness, attest - give testimony in a court of law
2.vouch - give surety or assume responsibilityvouch - give surety or assume responsibility; "I vouch for the quality of my products"
pledge, plight - promise solemnly and formally; "I pledge that I will honor my wife"
bail - secure the release of (someone) by providing security
assure, ensure, guarantee, insure, secure - make certain of; "This nest egg will ensure a nice retirement for us"; "Preparation will guarantee success!"
stipulate - give a guarantee or promise of; "They stipulated to release all the prisoners"
secure - assure payment of
3.vouch - summon (a vouchee) into court to warrant or defend a title
summon, summons, cite - call in an official matter, such as to attend court
4.vouch - give supporting evidencevouch - give supporting evidence; "He vouched his words by his deeds"
affirm, confirm, corroborate, substantiate, support, sustain - establish or strengthen as with new evidence or facts; "his story confirmed my doubts"; "The evidence supports the defendant"

vouch

verb
To confirm formally as true, accurate, or genuine.Also used with for:
Translations
يُؤَكِّد صِحَّةيَضْمَن، يَكْفَل
ručitzaručit se
garantere
staîfestavotta, ábyrgjast
apliecinātapstiprinātgalvot
zaručiť sa
doğrulamakkefil olmak

vouch

[vaʊtʃ]
A. VI to vouch for sthresponder de algo, garantizar algo
I cannot vouch for its authenticityno puedo responder de or garantizar su autenticidad
to vouch for sbresponder por or salir como fiador de algn
B. VT to vouch thatafirmar que ..., asegurar que ...

vouch

[ˈvaʊtʃ]
vouch for
vtse porter garant(e) de

vouch

vi to vouch for somebody/somethingsich für jdn/etw verbürgen; (legally) → für jdn/etw bürgen; to vouch for the truth of somethingsich für die Richtigkeit einer Sache verbürgen

vouch

[vaʊtʃ] vi to vouch for sthgarantire qc
to vouch for sb → garantire per qn

vouch

(vautʃ) verb
1. to say that one is sure that something is fact or truth. Will you vouch for the truth of the statement?
2. to guarantee the honesty etc of (a person). My friends will vouch for me.
ˈvoucher noun
a piece of paper which confirms that a sum of money has been, or will be, paid. a sales voucher.
References in classic literature ?
The country-girl, willing to give her utmost assistance, proposed to make an Indian cake, after her mother's peculiar method, of easy manufacture, and which she could vouch for as possessing a richness, and, if rightly prepared, a delicacy, unequalled by any other mode of breakfast-cake.
Be that as it may, I do not vouch for the fact, but merely advert to it, for the sake of being precise and authentic.
Well, fetch me your portfolio, if you can vouch for its contents being original; but don't pass your word unless you are certain: I can recognise patchwork.
Your squire Jocelyn knows him well, and will vouch him to be brother Ambrose, a monk in attendance upon the Prior of Jorvaulx.
I had no power to utter a cry, nor, I think, did he give me time to utter one, as he immediately approached me, and taking me in his arms (for, overwhelmed as I was, I was powerless, I say, to help myself), he began to make such professions to me that I know not how falsehood could have had the power of dressing them up to seem so like truth; and the traitor contrived that his tears should vouch for his words, and his sighs for his sincerity.
Rob in the Hood--for such the lady called you," said he, "I can vouch for your tale.
Those who had an opportunity of seeing the inside of the transactions which attended the progress of the controversy between this State and the district of Vermont, can vouch the opposition we experienced, as well from States not interested as from those which were interested in the claim; and can attest the danger to which the peace of the Confederacy might have been exposed, had this State attempted to assert its rights by force.
She is the Comtesse de Vandieres, and they say she is mad; but as she has only been here two months I will not vouch for the truth of these hearsays.
Oh, you need not avow this religious indifference, my Lord; your debaucheries and crimes would vouch for it.
They DO say, but I will not vouch for its truth, that Mr.
There was nothing to vouch for her soundness and the worth of her character, but the reputation of the building-yard whence she was launched headlong into the world of waters.
Well, I don't vouch for the truth of it myself," said Peechy Prauw, "though all the world knows that there's something strange about that house and grounds; but as to the story of Mud Sam, I believe it just as well as if it had happened to myself.