voyager


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Related to voyager: Voyager program

voy·age

 (voi′ĭj)
n.
1. A long journey to a foreign or distant place, especially by sea.
2.
a. often voyages The events of a journey of exploration or discovery considered as material for a narrative.
b. Such a narrative.
v. voy·aged, voy·ag·ing, voy·ag·es
v.intr.
To make a voyage.
v.tr.
To sail across; traverse: voyaged the western ocean.

[Middle English, from Old French veyage, from Late Latin viāticum, a journey, from Latin, provisions for a journey, from neuter of viāticus, of a journey, from via, road; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

voy′ag·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Voyager

(ˈvɔɪədʒə)
n
(Astronautics) either of two US spacecraft that studied the outer solar system; Voyager 1 visited Jupiter (1979) and Saturn (1980), Voyager 2 visited Jupiter (1979) and Saturn (1981) and made the first flyby of Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.voyager - a traveler to a distant land (especially one who travels by sea)voyager - a traveler to a distant land (especially one who travels by sea)
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
رَحّالَه
cestovatel-ka
farende
hajóutas
ferîalangur; sæfari

voyager

[ˈvɔɪədʒəʳ] Nviajero/a m/f (por mar)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

voyager

[ˈvɔɪɪdʒər] nvoyageur/euse m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

voyager

nPassagier(in) m(f); (Space) → Raumfahrer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

voyager

[ˈvɔɪədʒəʳ] nviaggiatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

voyage

(ˈvoiidʒ) noun
a usually long journey, especially by sea. The voyage to America used to take many weeks.
verb
to make such a journey. They voyaged for many months.
ˈvoyager noun
an old word for a person making a voyage, or who has made several voyages.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The voyage of Wyeth shows the regular and unobstructed flow of the rivers, on the east side of the Rocky Mountains, in contrast to those of the western side; where rocks and rapids continually menace and obstruct the voyager. We find him in a frail bark of skins, launching himself in a stream at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, and floating down from river to river, as they empty themselves into each other; and so he might have kept on upward of two thousand miles, until his little bark should drift into the ocean.
Two hundred years ago an old Dutch voyager likened its shape to that of a shoemaker's last.
The next day Hindbad, dressed in his best, returned to the voyager's house, and was received with open arms.
He may have been forty years old, and he was a great voyager on the inland sea.
One single gale such as now befriends us - let such a tempest whirl forward a balloon for four or five days(these gales often last longer) and the voyager will be easily borne, in that period, from coast to coast.
About eight miles above the mouth of the Wallamot the little squadron arrived at Vancouver's Point, so called in honor of that celebrated voyager by his lieutenant (Broughton) when he explored the river.
In many parts of the island the bottoms of the valleys ar covered in an extraordinary manner by myriads of grea loose angular fragments of the quartz rock, forming "stream of stones." These have been mentioned with surprise b every voyager since the time of Pernety.
His fate was not that of the voyager by sea and land; he was to travel in the spirit, and begin his journey sooner than he supposed.
Two years have passed since the voyagers sailed from their native shores.
I felt an irresistible curiosity to see those islands which the olden voyagers had so glowingly described.
Filled with anxiety, the voyagers hunted throughout every inch of the Thing for the precious box; but it had disappeared entirely.
For two days, therefore, the poor weather-worn voyagers kept quiet, and either staid on board of their vessel, or merely crept along under the cliffs that bordered the shore; and to keep themselves alive, they dug shellfish out of the sand, and sought for any little rill of fresh water that might be running towards the sea.