vozhd


Also found in: Wikipedia.

vozhd

(vɒʒd)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a Russian leader
References in periodicals archive ?
Lo que se quiere senalar claramente es la continuidad historica, la idea de que Rusia todavia necesita, como siempre ha necesitado, un lider dominante, sin escrupulos, autocratico, o en ruso, un vozhd.
He was a dictator, a Leader or Vozhd, but his dictatorship is unthinkable without the underlying Marxist-Leninist project to create a new man in a new society.
He is indeed the Vozhd (boss) in the Stalinist tradition, even if in a watered down sense.
The three central ideas that Lih builds through the text are the vozhd, the narod, and the vlast.
No simian Russian Patriarch, Imam, Polish priest, or Vozhd followed.
One of the book's strong points is its racy pen portraits not only of the disgusting vozhd himself but of his cronies and cowered generals.
Like many before him Pleshakov lays the blame squarely at the door of Stalin, the vozhd (leader) of the Soviet Union whose purges had cowed his military into meek subservience, without initiative or insight.
She begins with the Communist Party's basic features, its untrammeled faith in itself, its revolutionary mystique, its penchant for secrecy (inherited from its conspiratorial pre-revolutionary years and hypertrophied under Stalin), the initially moderate and then increasingly lunatic cult of the Vozhd (Leader), the growing tendency of the thousands of "little Stalins" to emulate their Leader, a habit congenial to them and perilous to their victims.
Pchelkin's Lenin, unlike other screen versions of the vozhd (leader), exhibited no traces of "messianic omnipotence or omniscience," and he did not, according to one Soviet historian, "immediately, or even always, find the sole correct answers.
Nothing supports this reading of events more powerfully than the vivid anecdote of the flabbergasted and frightened Petrograd Bolsheviks censoring their own vozhd.
45) Addressing the vozhd directly, Botvinnik played passive-aggressive: "I can accept any decision you think expedient.
Odd Arne Westad has noted that "the vozhd argued to his inner circle that the Soviet steps [in Eastern Europe] had been taken more for security than for the sake of immediate social revolution.