vulture


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Related to vulture: Egyptian vulture, eagle, turkey vulture

vul·ture

 (vŭl′chər)
n.
1. Any of various large birds of prey characteristically having dark plumage and a featherless head and neck and generally feeding on carrion. Species found in the Americas are in the family Cathartidae, and those found in Eurasia and Africa are in the family Accipitridae.
2. A person of a rapacious, predatory, or profiteering nature.

[Middle English, from Old French voltour, from Latin vultur.]

vulture

(ˈvʌltʃə)
n
1. (Animals) any of various very large diurnal birds of prey of the genera Neophron, Gyps, Gypaetus, etc, of Africa, Asia, and warm parts of Europe, typically having broad wings and soaring flight and feeding on carrion: family Accipitridae (hawks). See also griffon12, lammergeier
2. (Animals) any similar bird of the family Cathartidae of North, Central, and South America. See also condor, turkey buzzard
3. a person or thing that preys greedily and ruthlessly on others, esp the helpless
[C14: from Old French voltour, from Latin vultur; perhaps related to Latin vellere to pluck, tear]
ˈvulture-ˌlike adj

vul•ture

(ˈvʌl tʃər)

n.
1. any of several large, naked-headed New World birds of prey of the family Cathartidae that soar at a high altitude seeking carrion.
2. any of several superficially similar Old World birds of the family Accipitridae.
3. a person or thing that preys, esp. greedily or unscrupulously.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin vultur]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vulture - any of various large diurnal birds of prey having naked heads and weak claws and feeding chiefly on carrionvulture - any of various large diurnal birds of prey having naked heads and weak claws and feeding chiefly on carrion
bird of prey, raptor, raptorial bird - any of numerous carnivorous birds that hunt and kill other animals
Aegypiidae, family Aegypiidae - in some classifications considered the family comprising the Old World vultures which are more often included in the family Accipitridae
Old World vulture - any of several large vultures of Africa and Eurasia
cathartid, New World vulture - large birds of prey superficially similar to Old World vultures
2.vulture - someone who attacks in search of bootyvulture - someone who attacks in search of booty
aggressor, assailant, assaulter, attacker - someone who attacks
moss-trooper - a marauder and plunderer (originally operating in the bogs between England and Scotland)
Translations
sup
grib
vulturo
korppikotka
lešinarsup
keselyûkeselyű
hrægammur
ハゲワシ
독수리
vultur
grifas
grifsmaitu lija
vultur
sup
jastreb
gam
นกแร้ง
вольт
chim ó

vulture

[ˈvʌltʃəʳ] N
1. (Orn) → buitre m, zopilote m (CAm, Mex), aura f (Carib), carancho m (S. Cone), gallinazo m (Col, Andes), urubú m (Peru, Uru), zamuro m (Ven)
black vulturebuitre m negro
2. (fig) → buitre m
as the vultures from the press descendedcuando los buitres de la prensa se acercaron
they're like a lot of vulturesson una panda de buitres
see also culture

vulture

[ˈvʌltʃər] nvautour m

vulture

n (lit, fig)Geier m

vulture

(ˈvaltʃə) noun
a type of large bird of prey feeding chiefly on dead bodies.

vulture

نَسْر sup grib Geier όρνιο buitre korppikotka vautour lešinar avvoltoio ハゲワシ 독수리 gier gribb sęp abutre гриф gam นกแร้ง akbaba chim ó 秃鹰
References in classic literature ?
However, I am willing to stop fighting, and then perhaps I can grab a vulture. I like chicken better than pork, anyhow."
Why preyest thou thus upon the poet's heart, Vulture, whose wings are dull realities?
God help thee, old man, thy thoughts have created a creature in thee; and he whose intense thinking thus makes him a Prometheus; a vulture feeds upon that heart for ever; that vulture the very creature he creates.
At the moment when she is struggling in the convulsions of death, a vulture is flying by (there are a good many vultures in Adelmonte's country); this bird darts on the dead fowl, and carries it away to a rock, where it dines off its prey.
A shadow swung slowly across the ground beside him, and looking up, the ape-man saw Ska, the vulture, wheeling a wide circle above him.
Pickwick and Sam took up their present abode in very good, old-fashioned, and comfortable quarters, to wit, the George and Vulture Tavern and Hotel, George Yard, Lombard Street.
The first part of that entry is full of jokes, evidently flung about among the men, about somebody called the Vulture. It does not seem as if this person, whoever he was, was one of themselves, nor even an Englishman; neither is he exactly spoken of as one of the enemy.
Do not the white men gather themselves together even now against U'Cetywayo, as vultures gather round a dying ox?
They passed the place where Tom had slain the jaguar, but nothing was left but the bones; the ants, vultures and jungle animals having picked them clean in the night.
They were the dead of the Indian villages, carried by the Ganges to the level of the sea, and which the vultures, the only undertakers of the country, had not been able to devour.
The country abounded with aquatic and land birds, such as swans, wild geese, brant, ducks of almost every description, pelicans, herons, gulls, snipes, curlews, eagles, vultures, crows, ravens, magpies, woodpeckers, pigeons, partridges, pheasants, grouse, and a great variety of singing birds.
"Whoe'er I know shall shun th' impending fight, To dogs and vultures soon shall be a prey; For death is mine.