wacky

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wack·y

(wăk′ē) also whack·y (wăk′ē, hwăk′ē)
adj. wack·i·er, wack·i·est also whack·i·er or whack·i·est Slang
1. Eccentric or irrational: a wacky person.
2. Crazy; silly: a wacky outfit.

[Variant of whacky, probably from the phrase out of whack; see whack.]

wack′i·ly adv.
wack′i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wacky

(ˈwækɪ)
adj, wackier or wackiest
slang eccentric, erratic, or unpredictable
[C19 (in dialect sense: a fool, an eccentric): from whack (hence, a whacky, a person who behaves as if he had been whacked on the head)]
ˈwackily adv
ˈwackiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wack•y

(ˈwæk i)

also whacky



adj. wack•i•er, wack•i•est. Slang.
odd or irrational; crazy.
[1935–40; appar. whack (n., as in out of whack) + -y1]
wack′i•ly, adv.
wack′i•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wacky - ludicrous, foolish; "gave me a cockamamie reason for not going"; "wore a goofy hat"; "a silly idea"; "some wacky plan for selling more books"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"
2.wacky - informal or slang terms for mentally irregularwacky - informal or slang terms for mentally irregular; "it used to drive my husband balmy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

wacky

adjective unusual, odd, wild, strange, out there (slang), crazy, silly, weird, way-out (informal), eccentric, unpredictable, daft (informal), irrational, erratic, Bohemian, unconventional, far-out (slang), loony (slang), kinky (informal), off-the-wall (slang), unorthodox, nutty (slang), oddball, zany, goofy (informal), offbeat (informal), freaky (slang), outré, gonzo (slang), screwy (informal), wacko or whacko (informal) a wacky new comedy series
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

wacky

also whacky
adjective
2. Slang. Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Chiefly British: crackers.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

wacky

[ˈwækɪ] ADJ (wackier (compar) (wackiest (superl))) [person] → chiflado; [idea] → disparatado
wacky baccy (Brit) (hum) → chocolate m, costo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wacky

[ˈwæki] whacky hwæki] adj [person, comedian, idea] → farfelu(e); [film, TV show, humour] → délirant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wacky

adj (+er) (inf)verrückt (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

wacky

whacky [ˈwækɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) → pazzoide
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"We've upped the wackiness to give away some truly crazy prizes, as well as delicious food and cocktails on offer all night, plus music, games, and a few secret surprises to be revealed on the night.
It turned out there was a reason for the wackiness; it was to mark World Down Syndrome Day and then I clocked that my friend also had some bright odd socks on.
The Romans will combine the wackiness of TV's Takeshi's Castle with the physical challenge of classic show, The Gladiators.
Brock partially attributes Be More Chill's wackiness to the absence of a commercial producer during development.
Their combined wackiness would definitely drive the audience crazy.
He said: "I like the hustle and bustle of Hollywood, the wackiness, and the grittiness.
On the contrary, the more she lets her wackiness show, the happier she becomes and the more people she attracts.
Jeff Steinberg: Champion of Earth isn't a grand heroic epic, but it succeeds as a vehicle for frequent punch lines and entertaining wackiness.
Off-the-wall comic Fielding was supposed to be the "twist", but he has toned down the wackiness and upped the warmth to make himself indistinguishable from Mel or Sue.
Under the name The Worble, Tom has been capturing, carousing and creating video magic with Steve, Dave and friends for several years, not just for the sake of wackiness, but to explore new kinds of radical, the type of which pokes at the rules of stair-counting and acceptable terrain.
I'm also marking them down for any forced Fan Park wackiness.
I've been covering Hollywood for a long time, chronicling the ups and downs, the high drama, and the wackiness of the business.