wade through


Also found in: Idioms.

wade

 (wād)
v. wad·ed, wad·ing, wades
v.intr.
To walk in or through water or something else that similarly impedes normal movement.
v.tr.
To cross or pass through (water, for example) with difficulty: wade a swift creek.
n.
The act or an instance of wading.
Phrasal Verbs:
wade in (or into)
To begin resolutely or energetically to do (something): waded into the task.
wade through
To read (something) with great effort: waded through the school's correspondence.

[Middle English waden, from Old English wadan.]
Translations

w>wade through

vi +prep obj
(lit)waten durch
(fig)sich (durch)kämpfen durch
References in classic literature ?
These are the times, when in his whale-boat the rover softly feels a certain filial, confident, land-like feeling towards the sea; that he regards it as so much flowery earth; and the distant ship revealing only the tops of her masts, seems struggling forward, not though high rolling waves, but through the tall grass of a rolling prairie: as when the western emigrants' horses only show their erected ears, while their hidden bodies widely wade through the amazing verdure.
To be sure I often broke this rule, as people are apt to do with rules of the kind; it was not possible for a boy to wade through heavy articles relating to English politics and economics, but I do not think I left any paper upon a literary topic unread, and I did read enough politics, especially in Blackwood's, to be of Tory opinions; they were very fit opinions for a boy, and they did not exact of me any change in regard to the slavery question.
With every daybreak the rising sun had to wade through a crimson stream, luminous and sinister, like the spilt blood of celestial bodies murdered during the night.