wading


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to wading: Wading birds

wade

 (wād)
v. wad·ed, wad·ing, wades
v.intr.
To walk in or through water or something else that similarly impedes normal movement.
v.tr.
To cross or pass through (water, for example) with difficulty: wade a swift creek.
n.
The act or an instance of wading.
Phrasal Verbs:
wade in (or into)
To begin resolutely or energetically to do (something): waded into the task.
wade through
To read (something) with great effort: waded through the school's correspondence.

[Middle English waden, from Old English wadan.]

wading

(ˈweɪdɪŋ)
n
1.
a. the act of walking with the feet immersed in water, a stream, etc
b. (as modifier): wading gear.
2. (as modifier): wading gear.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wading - walking with your feet in shallow waterwading - walking with your feet in shallow water
walk, walking - the act of traveling by foot; "walking is a healthy form of exercise"
Translations

wading

[ˈweɪdɪŋ] CPD wading bird Nave f zancuda
wading pool N (US) → estanque m or piscina f para niños

wading

:
wading bird
n = wader a
wading pool
n (US) → Plan(t)schbecken nt
References in classic literature ?
Half swimming, half wading, with my head just out of water and avoiding splashing, I succeeded in putting about a hundred feet between myself and the spot where the Chinese had begun to wade ashore from the junk.
This he proceeded to verify by wading out over them himself, lighting matches as he came along.
A FEW minutes later Tom was in the shoal water of the bar, wading toward the Illinois shore.
In their hands were swords and spears, and they were leaping, waist-deep, into the sea-wash and wading ashore.
It was the first Martian my brother had seen, and he stood, more amazed than terrified, watching this Titan advancing deliberately towards the shipping, wading farther and farther into the water as the coast fell away.
A sea-bred boy would not have stayed a day on Earraid; which is only what they call a tidal islet, and except in the bottom of the neaps, can be entered and left twice in every twenty-four hours, either dry-shod, or at the most by wading. Even I, who had the tide going out and in before me in the bay, and even watched for the ebbs, the better to get my shellfish -- even I (I say) if I had sat down to think, instead of raging at my fate, must have soon guessed the secret, and got free.
Yet, sometimes, the best places to wade--or at least the places we imagine will be the best--are not in wading distance.