waggishly


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Related to waggishly: mischievousness, waggishness

wag·gish

 (wăg′ĭsh)
adj.
Characteristic of or resembling a wag; jocular or witty.

wag′gish·ly adv.
wag′gish·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.waggishly - in a waggish manner
Translations

waggishly

(o.f.) [ˈwægɪʃlɪ] ADV he said waggishlydijo zumbón

waggishly

advschalkhaft
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References in classic literature ?
Guppy's mother fell into an extraordinary passion of rolling her head and smiling waggishly at anybody who would look at her.
The President, the rector and myself, the three handsomest and highest-bred men in the assembly, led the way on the liberal side, waggishly warning all gallant gentlemen present to beware of disappointing the young ladies.
His wit was the Cockney's; it opened no doors into imagination, and Helen was drawn up short by "The more a lady has to say, the better," administered waggishly.
"Very odd birds, kestrels," said East, looking waggishly at his victim, who was still star-gazing.
He shook his head waggishly, leered at Hugh again, and laughed very much, as if he had said a noble thing, and rather thought he was coming out.
'Demnition discount,' returned Mr Mantalini, with a grin, and shaking his head waggishly.
"The language we use has real effects on our levels of tolerance for people with mental illness."I'm sure Prof Iraki, who comments waggishly on everything under the sun from school uniforms and Facebook friends to riparian buildings and bumps on superhighways is listening.
Founded by drummer and former fashion executive Fred Gehring (66, although he waggishly claims to be "When I'm 64") the technically perfect band specialise in performing live The Beatles' albums they recorded in the '' We bring version studio but never played on stage.
(Its colour has been waggishly attributed to the Hood dairy fortune.) TWBTA has pointed out that the firm has the greatest respect for Moore's oeuvre--Tsien had been one of his protegees as an architecture student in the 1970s --and Tod Williams has described the firm's Hood project as 'a complementary dialogue between old and new'.
Though proud to have played these parts, Buckley, 71, waggishly described this period as a "shocking coming of age." "I didn't realise I had transitioned into an older actress.
He's been in the newspaper business since his teens (he'll be 70 in March), initially at a paper published by his older brother, then at various Turkish and Turkish Cypriot outlets as journalist and editor -- then, since 1997, at his own paper, initially called Avrupa ('Europe'), its name waggishly changed to Afrika in 2001 as a dig against the corruption of political life in the north.