waiver


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waiver

intentional relinquishment of a right; the document that evidences a waiver: She signed a waiver.
Not to be confused with:
waver – vacillate; fluctuate; hesitate; falter; sway: She wanted to go, but her doubts made her waver.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

waiv·er

 (wā′vər)
n.
1.
a. Intentional relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege.
b. The document that evidences such relinquishment.
2. A dispensation, as from a rule or penalty.
3. Permission for a professional athletic club to assign a player to the minor leagues or release a player from the club, granted only after all other clubs have been given the opportunity to claim the player and have not done so.
4. A deferment.
tr.v. wai·vered, wai·ver·ing, wai·vers
To provide with a waiver or issue a waiver for.
Idioms:
clear waivers
To be unclaimed by another professional club and therefore liable to be assigned to a minor-league club or released.
on waivers
In a state of being available for claiming by other professional clubs.

[Anglo-Norman weyver, from weyver, to abandon; see waive.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

waiver

(ˈweɪvə)
n
1. (Law) the voluntary relinquishment, expressly or by implication, of some claim or right
2. (Law) the act or an instance of relinquishing a claim or right
3. (Law) a formal statement in writing of such relinquishment
[C17: from Old Northern French weyver to relinquish, waive]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

waiv•er

(ˈweɪ vər)

n.
1. the intentional relinquishment of a right.
2. an express or written statement specifying this.
[1620–30; < Anglo-French weyver, n. use of infinitive: to waive; see -er3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waiver - a formal written statement of relinquishment
relinquishing, relinquishment - the act of giving up and abandoning a struggle or task etc.
granting immunity, exemption, immunity - an act exempting someone; "he was granted immunity from prosecution"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

waiver

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

waiver

noun
1. A giving up of a possession, claim, or right:
2. The act of putting off or the condition of being put off:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
zrzeczenie się

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] N
1. (= renouncement) [of right, claim, fee] → renuncia f
2. (= exoneration) (from payment) → exoneración f
3. (= suspension) [of regulation, condition, restriction] → exención f
4. (= disclaimer) [of responsibility] → descargo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

waiver

[ˈweɪvər] ndispense f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

waiver

n (Jur) → Verzicht m (→ of auf +acc); (= document)Verzichterklärung f; (of law, contract, clause)Außerkraftsetzung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] nrinuncia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
To qualify for a hardship waiver, the applicant must demonstrate "extreme hardship" on behalf of a qualifying family member.
The defendant, who signed a jury waiver form in a courthouse jail cell, relied on the rule's language in appealing his conviction for child molestation.
Also, all customers whose premises are located in barangays Addition Hills, Barangka Drive, Plainview, Highway Hills, and Hulo in Mandaluyong City; Kapitolyo, Bagong Ilog, and Oranbo in Pasig City; Upper Bicutan in Taguig City; and Mambog in Binangonan, Rizal, will enjoy a full waiver of their monthly bill - meaning they will pay zero charges.
When he returned to the Philippines to be processed for his immigrant visa, he walked into an ambush: the consul accused him of fraud for overstaying, even though his waiver was already approved.
Massachusetts' waiver request proposed a closed Medicaid formulary, whereby the state could limit drug coverage with tiered copays.
Since a waiver of the statute of limitations is a derogation of the taxpayer's right to security against prolonged and unscrupulous investigations, our Court ruled that waivers of this kind must be carefully and strictly construed.
[USA], Oct 06 ( ANI ): The United States on Friday said that the waiver authority for sanctions under the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA) was not country-specific, adding that there are "strict criteria for considering a waiver."
Where defendant knowingly and voluntarily entered the plea agreement containing an appeal waiver, the court enforced the waiver where defendant's challenge to his sentence fell within the waiver and no miscarriage of justice would result from enforcing the waiver.
But Al-Awadhi has become increasingly skeptical that the Trump administration is applying its waiver standards to those who qualify.
Additionally, "A trading partner or stakeholder may submit a renewal request for any waiver, exception, or exemption it received that is of limited duration.
Section 1332 of the ACA permits a state to apply for a State Innovation Waiver to pursue innovative strategies for providing their residents with access to high-quality, comprehensive, affordable health insurance while retaining the basic protections of the ACA.
However, companies that have been convicted of certain felonies and misdemeanors or are determined to have violated anti-fraud provisions of securities laws are automatically disqualified from such benefits, unless they obtain a waiver from the Commission.