wale


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wale

 (wāl)
n.
1. A mark raised on the skin, as by a whip; a weal or welt.
2.
a. One of the parallel ribs or ridges in the surface of a fabric such as corduroy.
b. The texture or weave of such a fabric: a wide wale.
3. Nautical
a. A gunwale.
b. One of the heavy planks or strakes extending along the sides of a wooden ship.
tr.v. waled, wal·ing, wales
To raise marks on (the skin), as by whipping.

[Middle English, from Old English, variant of walu; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

wale

(weɪl)
n
1. (Pathology) the raised mark left on the skin after the stroke of a rod or whip
2. (Textiles) the weave or texture of a fabric, such as the ribs in corduroy
3. (Knitting & Sewing) a vertical row of stitches in knitting. Compare course14
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. a ridge of planking along the rail of a ship
b. See gunwale
vb (tr)
5. to raise a wale or wales on by striking
6. (Textiles) to weave with a wale
[Old English walu weal1; related to Old Norse vala knuckle, Dutch wäle]

wale

(weɪl)
n
1. a choice
2. anything chosen as the best
adj
choice
vb
(tr) to choose
[C14: from Old Norse val choice, related to German Wahl]

wale

(weɪl)

n., v. waled, wal•ing. n.
1. a ridge or stripe produced on the skin by the stroke of a rod or whip; welt.
2. the vertical rib or cord in woven cloth.
3. the texture or weave of a fabric.
4. any of certain strakes of thick outside planking on the sides of a wooden ship.
5. a horizontal timber or other support for reinforcing various upright members.
v.t.
6. to mark with wales.
7. to weave with wales.
8. to reinforce with a wale or wales.
[before 1050; Middle English; Old English walu ridge, rib]

Wale

 a selection, or that chosen as the best.
Example: wale of pleasures, 1887.

wale


Past participle: waled
Gerund: waling

Imperative
wale
wale
Present
I wale
you wale
he/she/it wales
we wale
you wale
they wale
Preterite
I waled
you waled
he/she/it waled
we waled
you waled
they waled
Present Continuous
I am waling
you are waling
he/she/it is waling
we are waling
you are waling
they are waling
Present Perfect
I have waled
you have waled
he/she/it has waled
we have waled
you have waled
they have waled
Past Continuous
I was waling
you were waling
he/she/it was waling
we were waling
you were waling
they were waling
Past Perfect
I had waled
you had waled
he/she/it had waled
we had waled
you had waled
they had waled
Future
I will wale
you will wale
he/she/it will wale
we will wale
you will wale
they will wale
Future Perfect
I will have waled
you will have waled
he/she/it will have waled
we will have waled
you will have waled
they will have waled
Future Continuous
I will be waling
you will be waling
he/she/it will be waling
we will be waling
you will be waling
they will be waling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been waling
you have been waling
he/she/it has been waling
we have been waling
you have been waling
they have been waling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been waling
you will have been waling
he/she/it will have been waling
we will have been waling
you will have been waling
they will have been waling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been waling
you had been waling
he/she/it had been waling
we had been waling
you had been waling
they had been waling
Conditional
I would wale
you would wale
he/she/it would wale
we would wale
you would wale
they would wale
Past Conditional
I would have waled
you would have waled
he/she/it would have waled
we would have waled
you would have waled
they would have waled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wale - a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
2.wale - thick plank forming a ridge along the side of a wooden shipwale - thick plank forming a ridge along the side of a wooden ship
garboard, garboard plank, garboard strake - the first wale laid next to the keel of a wooden ship
gun rest, gunnel, gunwale - wale at the top of the side of boat; topmost planking of a wooden vessel
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
plank, board - a stout length of sawn timber; made in a wide variety of sizes and used for many purposes

wale

noun
A ridge or bump raised on the flesh, as by a lash or blow:
References in classic literature ?
When I had reached my eighteenth Year I was recalled by my Parents to my paternal roof in Wales.
And, although these were all written in Welsh, it has been thought that some may have been brought to Wales from France.
Later still, when the Saxons came, the Britons were driven by degrees into the mountains of Wales and the wilds of Cornwall, while others fled again across the sea to Brittany.
And whether they first heard them in Armorica or in wild Wales, the Norman minstrels took the old Welsh stories and made them their own.
You can't have verbal communication with a man in New South Wales, you know.
And Magwitch - in New South Wales - having at last disclosed himself," said Mr.
I communicated to Magwitch - in New South Wales - when he first wrote to me - from New South Wales - the caution that he must not expect me ever to deviate from the strict line of fact.
Let England have its navigation and fleet -- let Scotland have its navigation and fleet -- let Wales have its navigation and fleet -- let Ireland have its navigation and fleet -- let those four of the constituent parts of the British empire be be under four independent governments, and it is easy to perceive how soon they would each dwindle into comparative insignificance.
Crickgelly, North Wales, was assuredly a very remote place to banish her to; but then the doctor was not a man to do things by halves: he knew the lengths to which my cunning and resolution were capable of carrying me; and he would have been innocent indeed if he had hidden his daughter from me in any place within reasonable distance of Barkingham.
However, I managed to mention my modest wishes to be conveyed at once in the direction of Wales, with no more than a becoming confusion of manner.
The extreme uniformity of the vegetation is the most remarkable feature in the landscape of the greater part of New South Wales.
The Blackheath is a very comfortable inn, kept by an old soldier; and it reminded me of the small inns in North Wales.