walk out


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walk

 (wôk)
v. walked, walk·ing, walks
v.intr.
1. To move over a surface by taking steps with the feet at a pace slower than a run: a baby learning to walk; a horse walking around a riding ring.
2.
a. To go or travel on foot: walked to the store.
b. To go on foot for pleasure or exercise; stroll: walked along the beach looking for shells.
c. To move in a manner suggestive of walking: saw a woodpecker walking up the tree trunk.
3. To conduct oneself or behave in a particular manner; live: walks in majesty and pride.
4. To appear as a supernatural being: The specter of famine walks through the land.
5. Informal
a. To go out on strike.
b. To resign from one's job abruptly; quit.
c. To be acquitted: The alleged killer walked.
6.
a. Baseball To go to first base after the pitcher has thrown four pitches ruled as balls.
b. Basketball To move illegally while holding the ball; travel.
7. Obsolete To be in constant motion.
v.tr.
1. To go or pass over, on, or through by walking: walk the financial district of a city.
2. To bring to a specified condition by walking: They walked me to exhaustion.
3. To cause to walk or proceed at a walk: walk a horse uphill.
4. To accompany in walking; escort on foot: walk the children home; walked me down the hall.
5. To traverse on foot in order to survey or measure; pace off: walked the bounds of the property.
6. To move (a heavy or cumbersome object) in a manner suggestive of walking: walked the bureau into the hall.
7. Baseball
a. To allow (a batter) to go to first base by throwing four pitches ruled as balls.
b. To cause (a run) to score by walking a batter. Often used with in.
n.
1.
a. The gait of a human or other biped in which the feet are lifted alternately with one part of a foot always on the ground.
b. The gait of a quadruped in which at least two feet are always touching the ground, especially the gait of a horse in which the feet touch the ground in the four-beat sequence of near hind foot, near forefoot, off hind foot, off forefoot.
c. The self-controlled extravehicular movement in space of an astronaut.
2. The act or an instance of walking, especially a stroll for pleasure or exercise.
3.
a. The rate at which one walks; a walking pace.
b. The characteristic way in which one walks.
4. The distance covered or to be covered in walking.
5. A place, such as a sidewalk or promenade, on which one may walk.
6. A route or circuit particularly suitable for walking: one of the prettiest walks in the area.
7.
a. Baseball A base on balls.
b. Basketball The act or an instance of moving illegally with the ball; traveling.
8. Sports
a. A track event in which contestants compete in walking a specified distance.
b. Racewalking.
9. An enclosed area designated for the exercise or pasture of livestock.
10.
a. An arrangement of trees or shrubs planted in widely spaced rows.
b. The space between such rows.
Phrasal Verbs:
walk out
1. To go on strike.
2. To leave suddenly, often as a signal of disapproval.
walk over Informal
1. To treat badly or contemptuously.
2. To gain an easy or uncontested victory over.
walk through
To perform (a play, for example) in a perfunctory fashion, as at a first rehearsal.
Idioms:
walk away from
1. To outdo, outrun, or defeat with little difficulty: walked away from the competition.
2. To survive (an accident) with very little injury.
3. To refuse to accept (an offer, for example).
4. To decline to continue participation in (a job, relationship, or activity, for example), often abruptly or nonchalantly.
5. To abandon (a property) on which one owes a mortgage, as when the principal of the mortgage exceeds the market value of the house.
walk in the park
Something that is easy to do or accomplish.
walk off/away with
1. To win easily or unexpectedly.
2. To steal.
walk of shame
Slang The walk home from a place where one unexpectedly spent the night engaged in activity, especially casual sex, considered embarrassing or shameful.
walk on air
To feel elated.
walk out on
To desert or abandon.
walk (someone) through
To guide (someone) deliberately through (a process), one step at a time: She walked me through the installation of new software.
walk the plank
To be forced, as by pirates, to walk off a plank extended over the side of a ship so as to drown.
walk the walk
1. To have skill, ability, or experience in a given activity or field.
2. To do what one claims one will do; deliver on one's promises.

[Middle English walken, from Old English wealcan, to roll; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

walk′a·bil′i·ty n.
walk′a·ble adj.

walk out

vb (intr, adverb)
1. to leave without explanation, esp in anger
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) to go on strike
3. walk out on informal to abandon or desert
4. walk out with obsolete or dialect Brit to court or be courted by
n
5. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a strike by workers
6. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the act of leaving a meeting, conference, etc, as a protest
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.walk out - stop work in order to press demandswalk out - stop work in order to press demands; "The auto workers are striking for higher wages"; "The employees walked out when their demand for better benefits was not met"
dissent, protest, resist - express opposition through action or words; "dissent to the laws of the country"
2.walk out - leave abruptly, often in protest or anger; "The customer that was not served walked out"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
3.walk out - leave suddenly, often as an expression of disapproval; "She walked out on her husband and children"
desert, desolate, forsake, abandon - leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch; "The mother deserted her children"

walk

verb
To go on foot:
Slang: hoof.
Idiom: foot it.
phrasal verb
walk out
To cease working in support of demands made upon an employer:
Idiom: go on strike.
noun
1. An act of walking, especially for pleasure:
2. A usually brief and regular journey on foot, especially for exercise:
Translations

w>walk out

vi
(= quit)gehen; to walk out of a meeting/roomeine Versammlung/einen Saal verlassen; to walk out on somebodyjdn verlassen; (= let down)jdn im Stich lassen; (= abandon) girlfriend etcjdn sitzen lassen (inf); to walk out on somethingaus etw aussteigen (inf)
(= strike)streiken, in Streik treten
to walk out with somebody (dated)mit jdm gehen
vt sep (dated, = court) → gehen mit
References in periodicals archive ?
It is believed around 1,000 construction workers - the entire plant - staged a dramatic walk out at the bioethanol plant in sympathy for the hundreds of workers who were sacked at the Lincolnshire refinery .
Up to 1,000 workers at the city's Bishop Street sorting office will walk out next Friday - one of the busiest days of the year for the post service.
Teachers at one Birmingham, seiiool were this afternoon meeting to de-aide whether to drop sanctions or walk out themselves.