wall brown


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wall brown

n
(Animals) any of three species of brown butterfly, esp the common Lasiommata megera, that habitually sun themselves on rocks and walls
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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There were some healthy looking wall brown butterflies which was good to see, because I have not spotted too many of them this year.
Butterflies such as the small blue, grayling and wall brown have also returned to their former habitat.
Even previously abundant species, such as the gatekeeper and the wall brown, have respectively seen 41 per cent and 87 per cent declines in abundance since 1976.
The wall brown butterflies (Lasiommata megera) is reported to have disappeared from its original habitat in southern England.
One of these is the Wall Brown, which used to be common along road verges, woodland rides and rough grassland, but started to disappear in the mid-1980s for reasons experts do not really understand, and is now rare away from the coasts.
Roedd gweirl|yn y cloddiau (Lasiommata megera; wall brown) o gwmpas hefyd ac erbyn hyn roeddwn i wedi gweld sawl glesyn cyffredin.
There are many species of insect to be seen, including the spectacular Southern Hawker Dragonfly, mining bees, pond creatures such as Water Scorpion and butterflies such as Wall Brown, Meadow Brown, Small Copper, Common Blue, Small Heath, Small Skipper, Large Skipper and the scarce Dingy Skipper.
"The High Brown Fritillary has always been a very scarce butterfly in the Midlands but what is even more worrying is the way that once relatively common species such as the Dingy Skipper, Wall Brown and Small Heath have gone into freefall over the past 10 years.
The Wall Brown; the Small Tortoiseshell; the Peacock; the Red Admiral; the Brimstone; the Holly Blue - these are just a few that we can see in spring and summer on a regular basis.
All the common species are here, along with breeding populations of Common Blue, Small Copper, Orange Tip, Green-veined White, Ringlet, Wall Brown and Small Skipper.
The garden has also been designed with three rare butterflies in mind - the wall brown butterfly, the greenhair streak and the dingy-skipper.
Regular butterfly visitors include the large white and red admiral, and it is hoped the meadow will attract ten varieties including the small copper, wall brown and meadow brown.