wanderer


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wan·der

 (wŏn′dər)
v. wan·dered, wan·der·ing, wan·ders
v.intr.
1. To move about without a definite destination or purpose.
2. To go by an indirect route or at no set pace; amble: We wandered toward town.
3. To proceed in an irregular course; meander: The path wanders through the park.
4. To behave in a manner that does not conform to morality or norms: wander from the path of righteousness.
5. To turn the attention from one subject to another with little clarity or coherence of thought: I had a point to make, but my mind started wandering.
6. To be directed without an object or in various directions: His eyes wandered to the balcony.
v.tr.
1. To wander across or through: wander the forests and fields.
2. To be directed around or over: Her gaze wandered the docks.
n.
The act or an instance of wandering.

[Middle English wanderen, from Old English wandrian.]

wan′der·er n.
wan′der·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: wander, ramble, roam, rove1, range, meander, stray, gallivant, gad1
These verbs mean to move about at random or without destination or purpose. Wander and ramble stress the absence of a fixed course or goal: The professor wandered down the hall lost in thought. "They would go off together, rambling along the river" (John Galsworthy).
Roam and rove emphasize freedom of movement, often over a wide area: "Herds of horses and cattle roamed at will over the plain" (George W. Cable)."For ten long years I roved about, living first in one capital, then another" (Charlotte Brontë).
Range suggests wandering in all directions: "a large hunting party known to be ranging the prairie" (Francis Parkman).
Meander suggests leisurely wandering over an irregular or winding course: "He meandered to and fro ... observing the manners and customs of Hillport society" (Arnold Bennett).
Stray refers to deviation from a proper course or area: "The camels strayed to graze on the branches of distant acacias" (Jeffrey Tayler).
Gallivant refers to wandering in search of pleasure: gallivanted all over the city during our visit. Gad suggests restlessness: gadded about unaccompanied in foreign places.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled lifewanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
nomad - a member of a people who have no permanent home but move about according to the seasons
drifter, vagrant, vagabond, floater - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
2.wanderer - a computer program that prowls the internet looking for publicly accessible resources that can be added to a database; the database can then be searched with a search engine
computer program, computer programme, programme, program - (computer science) a sequence of instructions that a computer can interpret and execute; "the program required several hundred lines of code"

wanderer

Translations
مُتَجَوِّل،هائِم، تائِه
tulák
vandrervandringsmand
vándor
ferîalangur
amaçsız gezip duran kimse

wanderer

[ˈwɒndərəʳ] N (= traveller) → viajero/a m/f (pej) → vagabundo/a m/f; (= tribesman, nomad) → nómada mf
the wanderer returns! (hum) → ¡ha vuelto el viajero!
I've always been a wanderernunca he querido establecerme de fijo en un sitio

wanderer

[ˈwɒndər] nvagabond(e) m/f

wanderer

nWandervogel m; the Masai are wanderersdie Massai sind ein Wanderstamm m; that child is a real wandererdas Kind treibt sich überall herum

wanderer

[ˈwɒndərəʳ] ngiramondo m/f inv

wander

(ˈwondə) verb
1. to go, move, walk etc (about, in or on) from place to place with no definite destination in mind. I'd like to spend a holiday wandering through France; The mother wandered the streets looking for her child.
2. to go astray or move away from the proper place or home. His mind wanders; My attention was wandering.
noun
an act of wandering. He's gone for a wander round the shops.
ˈwanderer noun
ˈwanderlust noun
the wish to travel. He's always travelling – his wanderlust will never be satisfied.
References in classic literature ?
Had the wanderer remained awake for another half hour a strange sight would have met his eyes.
My name is John Ferrier," the wanderer explained; "me and that little un are all that's left o' twenty-one people.
They speedily resolved themselves into three large brown birds, which circled over the heads of the two wanderers, and then settled upon some rocks which overlooked them.
Side by side on the narrow shawl knelt the two wanderers, the little prattling child and the reckless, hardened adventurer.
I am a wanderer and an exile, entirely through the fault of others.
The fugitive goat, scared and frightened, ran towards the company as if seeking their protection and then stood still, and the goatherd coming up seized it by the horns and began to talk to it as if it were possessed of reason and understanding: "Ah wanderer, wanderer, Spotty, Spotty; how have you gone limping all this time?
Her parents had been continental wanderers, and after a roaming babyhood she had lost them both, and been taken in charge by her aunt, Medora Manson, also a wanderer, who was herself returning to New York to "settle down.
History ceases to take interest in the crownless wanderer.
This fire blazed all night, and was amply replenished at daybreak; so that the towering pillar of smoke could not but be descried by the wanderers if within the distance of a day's journey.
It is like the message of reprieve from the sentence of sorrow suspended over many a home, even if some of the men in her have been the most homeless mortals that you may find among the wanderers of the sea.
Rather than providing a chapter-by-chapter commentary on MIE, Wanderer has chosen to provide his own route into Brandom's philosophy, one which pays dividends.
But Wanderer didn't expect Melanie to refuse to relinquish possession of her mind.