wandering albatross


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

wan·der·ing albatross

(wŏn′dər-ĭng)
n.
A large, mostly white albatross (Diomedea exulans) of southern seas, having long narrow wings whose spread is regarded as the largest of any living bird.

wandering albatross

n
(Animals) a large albatross, Diomedea exulans, having a very wide wingspan and a white plumage with black wings
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wandering albatross - very large albatrosswandering albatross - very large albatross; white with wide black wings
mollymawk, albatross - large web-footed birds of the southern hemisphere having long narrow wings; noted for powerful gliding flight
genus Diomedea - type of the Diomedeidae
References in periodicals archive ?
These include the Wandering Albatross, which has the widest wingspan of any living bird, the Coastal Redwood, which is the talledst tree in the world, and the Deep Cave Springtail, which is among the deepest-dwelling terrestrial creatures.
Animals like wandering albatross (having the widest wingspan of any bird), coastal redwood (tallest tree in the world), Paedophryne amauensis (smallest frog, and smallest vertebrate), Amazon water lily (one of the largest aquatic plants), coelacanth (one of the world's oldest living species) and deep cave springtail (one of deepest-dwelling terrestrial creatures) formed the subject matter of the doodle.
"The scenery was amazing and so vast and we saw wildlife such as three different types of penguin, humpback whales every day, killer whales and numerous sea birds -I even saw a wandering albatross when we were going through the Drake Passage in 12 metre waves on our return leg.
Populations of the wandering albatross have already seen rapid declines as the birds have become accidentally caught in long-line fisheries.
| Populations of the wandering albatross have seen rapid declines as the birds are accidentally caught in long-line fisheries, with one population from Bird Island, South Georgia, falling 50% between 1972 and 2010, according to data from the British Antarctic Survey.
sandersi (top) would have dwarfed modern-day fliers, including the California condor (bottom left) and the wandering albatross (right).
Washington, DC, United States -- The wandering albatross, a magnificent seabird that navigates the ocean winds and can glide almost endlessly over the water, boasts the biggest wingspan of any bird alive today, extending almost 12 feet (3.5 meters).
With 20-24-foot wingspan, scientists believe the fossilized remains of the extinct giant was twice the size of today's largest flying bird, the wandering albatross said the study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
South Georgia is also an important breeding ground for four species of albatross, including the wandering albatross, the world's largest seabird.
It really would be a poorer world if the wandering albatross becomes yet another shocking extinction statistic!
Based on the available data, estimates of per-species proportions of the total seabird bycatch over the 3 years were 42% other species, 32% black-browed albatross, 17% Atlantic yellow-nosed albatross, 6% albatross species, 1% wandering albatross, 1% Cory's shearwater, and less than 1% Tristan albatross.