wanness


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wan

 (wŏn)
adj. wan·ner, wan·nest
1. Unnaturally pale, as from physical or emotional distress.
2. Suggestive or indicative of weariness, illness, or unhappiness; melancholy: a wan expression.
intr.v. wanned, wan·ning, wans
To become pale.

[Middle English, pale, gloomy, from Old English wann, gloomy, dark.]

wan′ly adv.
wan′ness n.

WAN

 (wăn)
n.
A communications network that uses such devices as telephone lines, satellite dishes, or radio waves to span a larger geographic area than can be covered by a LAN.

[w(ide) a(rea) n(etwork).]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wanness - unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)wanness - unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)
complexion, skin color, skin colour - the coloring of a person's face
Translations
شُحوب
blegnæbbethed
hal ványság
fölvi
solgunluk

wanness

[ˈwɒnnɪs] Npalidez f

wanness

n (= paleness)Blässe f; (of light)Mattheit f

wan

(won) adjective
pale and sickly-looking. She still looks wan after her illness.
ˈwanly adverb
ˈwanness noun
References in classic literature ?
In the pale moonlight, which lent a wanness of its own to the delicate face where thoughtful care already mingled with the winning grace and loveliness of youth, the too bright eye, the spiritual head, the lips that pressed each other with such high resolve and courage of the heart, the slight figure firm in its bearing and yet so very weak, told their silent tale; but told it only to the wind that rustled by, which, taking up its burden, carried, perhaps to some mother's pillow, faint dreams of childhood fading in its bloom, and resting in the sleep that knows no waking.
About his large bright eyes that used to be so merry there was a wanness and a restlessness that changed them altogether.
When a door, at length, closed upon her, my glance sought instinctively and eagerly the countenance of the brother--but he had buried his face in his hands, and I could only perceive that a far more than ordinary wanness had overspread the emaciated fingers through which trickled many passionate tears.