war bonds


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Related to war bonds: victory bonds

war bonds

Government debt certificates, guaranteeing payment with interest, sold to help the war effort.
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1918 : People were being urged to buy war bonds in a big advert in the Examiner, stating: "Buy PS1,000 worth of National War Bonds and you will have provided one fifth of the money to purchase a tank.
Speaking to the Daily Mail, he described being inside as like "being in a war zone" and said he was still in touch with some of his fellow inmates because "when you go through things in jail it bonds you in a way a war bonds men together".
People helped by growing "victory" gardens to alleviate to strain on commercial farms, which provided food for the troops; food rationing; purchasing war bonds and war stamps; and by making soldierEs kits, which were small amenities given to soldiers before leaving for military service.
It discusses all forms of propaganda and its dissemination in changing military contexts during the war, analyzing the content, style, and significance of 46 sources, such as films, posters, leaflets, paintings, pamphlets, newspapers, cartoons, radio, coins, stamps, and monuments, including those related to Nazi propaganda, leadership, women at war, war bonds, propaganda under occupation, images of the enemy, and other aspects.
As war is expensive, the Canadian government naturally resorted to the practice of selling war bonds.
As players rank up within a class, they receive a currency called War Bonds that can be used to purchase weapons.
In the declaration Arseniy Yatsenyuk included war bonds worth UAH100,192 which he had purchased in 2014.
It shook the earth as it passed the crowd, crawling at four miles an hour on its way to the park at Greyfriars Green, Broadgate - a parcel of land where a Blue Peter-style clock had been erected to show the number of war bonds sold.
In line with her work on frequency-hopping spectrum, Lamarr also participated in raising funds for WWII, by capitalising on her celebrity status and selling war bonds.
On returning home, he was greeted by villagers who presented him with PS50 in war bonds.
Louis Schwartz, a waiter in the Sixth Avenue Delicatessen who was famous for selling more than $4 million worth of war bonds, claimed to have invented the famous slogan "Send a Salami to Your Boy in the Army," which became a permanent catchphrase at Katz's Delicatessen and other delicatessens in the city.