warbonnet

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warbonnet

(ˈwɔːˌbɒnɪt)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a headband with trailing feathers, worn by certain North American Indian warriors as a headdress
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The front of the cap is covered in ermine; the feathers appear to be attached high on the cap not over the brow as on later so-called "warbonnets".
Mums loaded the boots on the bright red tricycles with marmalade and jam sandwiches, alongside the bottle of dandelion and burdock, fizzing under its crown cork top, and we issued bloodchilling shrieks into the fuzzed air of humming summer - our feather warbonnets of many colours standing proud and our faces painted with lipstick.
"Best Of 1989" ($29.95) is a two hour representative anthology of Pentrex railroad recording projects that features the Santa Fe Warbonnets; the Norfolk & Wester 611; The Napap Valley Wine Train; the Norfolk & Wetern 1218; CSX F-Units; the Cayahoga Valley Line; the Trailer Train of Santa Fe; the NKP 765; and the Western Allegheny F-units.
In this configuration the Scots would still wear kilts and the Sioux their warbonnets. In this new, more complex world critical scholars understand the need to refigure racial analysis and identity formation after the crutch and safety of essentialism are removed (Luke 1994; Keating 1995; Thompson 1996; Gallagher 1994; Wellman 1996).
Around the turn of the nineteenth century, the Sioux began to decorate their ceremonial eagle feather warbonnets with pairs of beaded rosettes positioned at either side of the browband.
"Recently Crazy Crow Trading Post (Pottsboro, Texas) published an excellent book about warbonnets by Barry E.
In recent years, there seems to have been an increase in the use of warbonnets, horned headdresses, old-time hide shirts and hair ornaments, in combination with other dance accessories, and this constant revitalization of earlier decorative styles is one of the major driving forces of today's powwow.
And as if the old photographs weren't enough to satiate one's appetite to learn about the historical and cultural significance of warbonnets, more than half the book details the materials and construction techniques used to create many styles including those without trailers, those with single trailers and those with double-trailers of feathers.
This issue begins with an unusual look at American Indian material culture use--horse warbonnets. Thanks to James Keyser of Portland, Oregon for his extensive research.
The three men are dressed in warbonnets, fringed buckskin shirts, and hide leggings.
The Crow, Blackfeet, and Sioux used ermine tubes extensively on warbonnets and war shirts.
Frustratingly, although there are many surviving photographs of the veteran chief wearing eagle feather warbonnets, not a single one shows the chief actually wearing the warbonnet in the former Taylor Collection.