warchalking


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Related to warchalking: Wardriving, Bluejacking, Bluesnarfing

warchalking

(ˈwɔːtʃɔːkɪŋ)
n
(Computer Science) the practice of marking chalk symbols on walls and pavements at places where local wireless internet connections may be obtained for free via a computer, usually without permission
[C21: from w(ireless) a(cess) r(evolution) + gerund of chalk]
ˈwarchalker n
Translations

warchalking

n (Comput, Telec) → Warchalking nt
References in periodicals archive ?
WarChalking is used to draw symbols in public places to advertise open Wi-Fi networks.
Recreational exploration of other people's access points has become known as wardriving, and the leaving of grafiti describing available services as warchalking.
Warchalking, an activity where people identify locations for "free" Internet access, originally got its name from people literally using chalk to mark locations outside of buildings that offered good reception.
Jargon codes include warchalking (symbols used to indicate the presence and type of wireless network signal [Warchalking 2003]), underground terminology, or an innocent conversation that conveys special meaning because of facts known only to the speakers.
(The term is an abbreviation for "wireless fidelity.") But Wi-Fi is only bound by the strength of its signal and it has spawned a cult that engages in "warchalking."
Warchalking is another method of finding access points and making
* El warchalking, (3) que consiste en caminar por la calle con un computador portatil dotado de una tarjeta WLAN, buscando la senal de puntos de acceso.
This article does not aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the technology; rather, it will first discuss some aspects of wi-fi, and then an activity to which the technology has given rise, "warchalking."
It will legitimately signpost the areas rather than rely on last year's craze of "Warchalking", where hackers chalk-marked the areas, taking particular delight to target large business buildings.
Many companies have wireless nodes that could be similarly hijacked, according to John Bumgarner, CISSP, CEO of Cyber Watch, Inc., who has located hundreds of wireless nodes in Charlotte, North Carolina, although he says that he hasn't seen any warchalking evidence yet.
Technology experts at Hammond Suddards Edge are warning Birmingham businesses to be on the lookout for warchalking.
The "drive-by" hacking phenomenon has also been dubbed "warchalking" because hackers who have succeeded in breaking in mark buildings with a tell-tale chalk sign to invite further attacks.