warder


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ward·er 1

 (wôr′dər)
n.
1. A guard, porter, or watcher of a gate or tower.
2. Chiefly British A prison guard.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman wardere, from Old North French warder, to guard; see warden.]

war′der·ship′ n.

ward·er 2

 (wôr′dər)
n.
A baton formerly used by a ruler or commander as a symbol of authority and to signal orders.

[Middle English, possibly from warden, to ward, from Old English weardian; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

warder

(ˈwɔːdə) or feminine

wardress

n
1. (Law) chiefly Brit an officer in charge of prisoners in a jail
2. a person who guards or has charge of something
[C14: from Anglo-French wardere, from Old French warder to guard, of Germanic origin]
ˈwardership n

warder

(ˈwɔːdə)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly) a staff or truncheon carried by a ruler as an emblem of authority and used to signal his wishes or intentions
[C15: perhaps from Middle English warden to ward]

ward•er1

(ˈwɔr dər)

n.
1. a person who guards something, as a doorkeeper.
2. a soldier or other person set to guard an entrance.
[1350–1400; Middle English warder(e) < Anglo-French; see ward, -er2]
ward′er•ship`, n.

ward•er2

(ˈwɔr dər)

n.
a truncheon or staff of office or authority, esp. one carried by a monarch to signal commands.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.warder - a person who works in a prison and is in charge of prisoners
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
wardress - a woman warder

warder

wardress
noun jailer, guard, screw (slang), warden, prison officer, keeper, captor, custodian, turnkey (archaic), gaoler The inmates of the jail have taken a prison warder hostage.

warder

noun
British. A guard or keeper of a prison:
Translations
حارِس، سَجّان
fængselsbetjentfangevogter
vörîur
čuvajpaznik

warder

[ˈwɔːdəʳ] N (esp Brit) → celador(a) m/f

warder

[ˈwɔːrr] n (British)gardien(ne) m/f prison warder

warder

n (Brit) → Wärter(in) m(f), → Aufseher(in) m(f)

warder

[ˈwɔːdəʳ] nguardia carceraria

ward

(woːd) noun
1. a room with a bed or beds for patients in a hospital etc. He is in a surgical ward of the local hospital.
2. a person who is under the legal control and care of someone who is not his or her parent or (a ward of court) of a court. She was made a ward of court so that she could not marry until she was eighteen.
ˈwarder noun
a person who guards prisoners in a jail. He shot a warder and escaped from jail.
References in classic literature ?
First, the villain and heartless vagabond sought to win my good-will and purchase my compliance, so as to get me, like a treacherous warder, to deliver up to him the keys of the fortress I had in charge.
For ten seconds there was silence as though all had been struck dumb; even the warder stepped back, mechanically retreated to the door, and stood immovable.
The man whom he had thrust back followed him into the room and succeeded in seizing him by the shoulder; he was a warder; but Nikolay pulled his arm away.
Swinging himself up boldly by means of this friendly vine, he crept through the window and in a moment more had sprung upon the warder from behind and gripped him hard about the throat.
Now, although the warder's room was a very uncomfortable one (being, in every point of decoration and convenience, several hundred degrees inferior to the common infirmary of a county jail), it had at present the merit of being wholly deserted save by Mr.
Returning in less than three minutes, a warder announced ``that the Prior Aymer of Jorvaulx, and the good knight Brian de Bois-Guilbert, commander of the valiant and venerable order of Knights Templars, with a small retinue, requested hospitality and lodging for the night, being on their way to a tournament which was to be held not far from Ashby-de-la-Zouche, on the second day from the present.''
Another sable warder (a carpenter, who had once eaten two geese for a wager) opened the door, and showed me into the best parlour.
I don't think they can kill Drugger Davis on that old vague story of the poison; and as for the convict who killed the warder, I suppose it's obvious that you haven't got him.
Beneath the leaden sky, And by each side a warder walked,
Yet prison doors were ill warders of his fame, and letters of recall followed closely upon pardon; but death overtook the exile before he could reach the capital, and at the age of sixty his wanderings came to an end.
Now after making this allowance, the truth remained that if I could find out something about a castle before ringing the door- bell -- I mean hailing the warders -- it was the sensible thing to do.
She was a five-hundred-ton boat; and besides her thirty-eight jail-birds, she carried twenty-six of a crew, eighteen soldiers, a captain, three mates, a doctor, a chaplain, and four warders. Nearly a hundred souls were in her, all told, when we set said from Falmouth.