warding off


Also found in: Idioms.

ward·ing off

 (wär′dĭng)
n.
A violation of the rules in lacrosse in which a player in possession of the ball uses a free hand or arm to push or control the movement of a defender or a defender's stick.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Keeping ever close by the work of excavation, he busied himself incessantly with the welfare and health of his workpeople, and was singularly fortunate in warding off the epidemics common to large communities of men, and so disastrous in those regions of the globe which are exposed to the influences of tropical climates.
Abdalla Hamdok, chaired Thursday at the Council of Ministers a meeting of the committee for warding off the impacts of the heavy rainfall and floods, in presence of a representatives of concerned ministries and organs.
They are a good source of vitamin C, which as well as warding off colds and flu, assists in making collagen, which keeps the skin looking youthful.
We believe warding off evil is preferred to achieving commonweal.
"We have not been successful in warding off terrorist attacks," he added.
Brown exhorts that self-defense is far more than simply warding off physical attack; it is a life attitude of being mindful of one's own actions to keep oneself out of dangerous situations.
Superbly enhanced with more than one hundred full color photographs of these often rare and sometimes obscure instruments, Sounds Of The Silk Road introduces the use, history, sounds, playing techniques, decorations, and symbolism of these instruments that were so integral a part of Asian cultures from the warding off of evil spirits to the celebrations of life's milestones including marriages, births, and funerary rites.
An initial chapter provides a general overview of cancer, and a concluding section considers some general changes in lifestyle that anyone interested in warding off cancer or a multitude of other diseases should consider.
In the hope of warding off such an event, Fortress Press solicited essays from two New Testament scholars who represent opposed points of view.
Now, according to the results of a two-year pilot study conducted by a team of Australian researchers led by Brian Gulson of Macquarie University, antiresorptive therapy may also be useful in warding off the deleterious health effects of elevated blood lead levels by inhibiting lead's release from the skeleton into the bloodstream [EHP 110:1017-1023].
And Dr Calabrese adds that anyone taking echinacea for long periods in the hope of warding off colds is probably wasting their money.