wardress


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Related to wardress: gaolers

ward•ress

(ˈwɔr drɪs)

n.
a woman who is a warder.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wardress - a woman warder
matron - a wardress in a prison
warder - a person who works in a prison and is in charge of prisoners
Translations

wardress

[ˈwɔːdrɪs] Nceladora f

wardress

n (Brit) → Wärterin f, → Aufseherin f

wardress

[ˈwɔːdrɪs] nguardia carceraria (donna)
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References in periodicals archive ?
A former prison wardress is found dead at an archaeological dig near the Dead Sea.
After hearing her fate, Rawlinson shrieked and fell backwards, having to be helped back up by a wardress.
Ms Leigh later gave a graphic account of her treatment in a WSPU publication: "On Saturday afternoon the wardress forced me onto the bed and two doctors came in.
Naoom featured the story of Ghalia -- starred by Nelly Kareem -- who was a wardress at women's prison in Al-Qanater until she is unfairly accused of killing the father-in-law of her husband's previous wife.
the former a lampoon upon the Lady Missionary, with a bible in one hand and a club in the other; the latter a sort of celestial Hospital Matron or Wardress, who moved with a crinkle of starched linen and thump of stout boots.
One doctor used to put his finger through the extreme end of the left side of my jaw and cut me while the wardress put her finger through the right side of my jaw.
Curiously, when she appeared in court - apparently just one of 75 arrests during a WSPU attempt to get Lancashire and Yorkshire clogs resounding on the floor of the House of Commons - the magistrate was most distressed to be told she was 17 (she was in fact only 16) and insisted on sending her home, much against her wishes, with money from the Poor Box and accompanied by an elderly wardress as chaperone!
Mrs Waddy came on the female convict transport Lady Rowena, reputedly as a wardress and settled in New South Wales.
Sefika, the wardress, is the major female character in the novel and she is endowed with an insatiable sexual appetite.
And running him pretty close in the worst thespian of the year contest is Helen Fraser as wardress Sylvia Hollamby, who is supposed to be the harsh face of authority.
The soldier driver, a brute of a fellow, belabored the poor beasts so savagely with the butt end of his whip that the wardress at the gate, indignant at the sight, asked hif he had no compassion for animals.
This is thematised in Carter's novel through the resonance with Foucault's Panopticon, in which the prison wardress is no less imprisoned than the incarcerated because no less subject to observation: "In that room she'd sit all day and stare and stare and stare at her murderesses and they, in turn, sat all day and stared at her" (210).