warm-blooded


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warm-blood·ed

also warm·blood·ed (wôrm′blŭd′ĭd)
adj.
1. Zoology Maintaining a relatively constant and warm body temperature independent of environmental temperature; homeothermic.
2. Ardent; passionate.

warm′-blood′ed·ness, warm′blood′ed·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

warm-blooded

adj
1. ardent, impetuous, or passionate
2. (Zoology) (of birds and mammals) having a constant body temperature, usually higher than the temperature of the surroundings. Technical name: homoiothermic
ˌwarm-ˈbloodedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

warm′-blood′ed

or warm′blood′ed,



adj.
1. of or designating animals, as mammals and birds, having a body temperature that is relatively constant and independent of the environment.
2. ardent; impetuous: warm-blooded valor.
[1785–95]
warm′-blood′ed•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

warm-blood·ed

(wôrm′blŭd′ĭd)
Having a relatively warm body temperature that stays about the same regardless of changes in the temperature of the surroundings. Birds and mammals are warm-blooded.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.warm-blooded - having warm blood (in animals whose body temperature is internally regulated)
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
cold-blooded - having cold blood (in animals whose body temperature is not internally regulated)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

warm-blooded

adjective homeothermic or homeothermal (technical) the theory that dinosaurs were warm-blooded
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

warm-blooded

[ˈwɔːmˈblʌdɪd] ADJde sangre caliente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

warm-blooded

adjwarmblütig; (fig)heißblütig; warm-blooded animalWarmblüter m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

warm-blooded

[ˌwɔːmˈblʌdɪd] adj (animal) → a sangue caldo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

warm

(woːm) adjective
1. moderately, or comfortably, hot. Are you warm enough, or shall I close the window?; a warm summer's day.
2. (of clothes) protecting the wearer from the cold. a warm jumper.
3. welcoming, friendly, enthusiastic etc. a warm welcome; a warm smile.
4. tending to make one hot. This is warm work!
5. (of colours) enriched by a certain quantity of red or pink, or (of red etc) rich and bright. a warm red; I don't want white walls – I want something warmer.
verb
1. to make moderately hot. He warmed his hands in front of the fire.
2. to become friendly (towards) or enthusiastic (about). She warmed to his charm.
noun
an act of warming. Give your hands a warm in front of the fire.
ˈwarmly adverb
warmness noun
ˈwarmth () noun
the state of being warm. the warmth of the fire; The actor was delighted by the warmth of the applause; The warmth of her smile made me feel welcome.
ˌwarm-ˈblooded adjective
1. having a blood temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. warm-blooded animals such as man.
2. enthusiastic; passionate. When I was young and warm-blooded, I was passionate about many things that don't interest me now.
warmed-over adjective
(American).
1. warmed up or heated again. warmed-over soup.
2. (of a story, idea etc) that has been heard many times before so that it is no longer interesting or relevant.
ˌwarmˈhearted adjective
kind and affectionate. a warmhearted old lady; a warmhearted action.
ˌwarmˈheartedness noun
warm up
to make or become warm. The room will soon warm up; Have a cup of coffee to warm you up.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Certainly his kind have left horrible unconscious memories in all warm-blooded life.
It was this last habit that gave me the opportunity I craved to capture one of these herbivorous cetaceans--that is what Perry calls them--and make as good a meal as one can on raw, warm-blooded fish; but I had become rather used, by this time, to the eating of food in its natural state, though I still balked on the eyes and entrails, much to the amusement of Ghak, to whom I always passed these delicacies.
A snake would be a good illustration of this, for it is cold-blooded, and therefore removed from the temptations which often weaken or restrict warm-blooded creatures.
The guanaco is nearly the only warm-blooded quadruped, and it is found in quite inconsiderable numbers compared with the multitude of flies.
US PRESIDENT Donald Trump is known for his blunders on social media, and his latest is getting Wales mixed up with the warm-blooded animals that live in the sea.
It is clear that the government wants to appease the warm-blooded 'Naya Pakistanis' who voted the party while believing the populist promises in order to behold an overnight revolution in governance.
He said: "As an artist, I probably have a role to play in romancing the idea of Europe and seeing it as warm-blooded.
Instead of a warm-blooded, feathery bird eating a coldblooded fish or worm, what if a coldblooded creature eats a warm-blooded, baby bird?
Rather than using Arabian horses, the riders have taken warm-blooded European horses.
ISLAMABAD -- A new research analysed more than 270 million years of data on animals showed that mammals and birds both warm-blooded animals may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians.
Additionally, samples also tested positive for Toxoplasma gondii, one of the most common parasitic infections of man and other warm-blooded animals.