warming


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warm

 (wôrm)
adj. warm·er, warm·est
1. Somewhat hotter than temperate; having or producing a comfortable and agreeable degree of heat; moderately hot: a warm climate.
2. Having the natural heat of living beings: a warm body.
3. Preserving or imparting heat: a warm jacket.
4. Having or causing a sensation of unusually high body heat, as from exercise or hard work; overheated.
5. Marked by enthusiasm; ardent: warm support.
6. Characterized by liveliness, excitement, or disagreement; heated: a warm debate.
7. Marked by or revealing friendliness or sincerity; cordial: warm greetings.
8. Loving; passionate: a warm embrace.
9. Excitable, impetuous, or quick to be aroused: a warm temper.
10. Predominantly red or yellow in tone: a warm sunset.
11. Recently made; fresh: a warm trail.
12. Close to discovering, guessing, or finding something, as in certain games.
13. Informal Uncomfortable because of danger or annoyance: Things are warm for the bookies.
v. warmed, warm·ing, warms
v.tr.
1. To raise slightly in temperature; make warm: warmed the rolls a bit more; warm up the house.
2. To make zealous or ardent; enliven.
3. To fill with pleasant emotions: We were warmed by the sight of home.
v.intr.
1. To become warm: The rolls are warming in the oven.
2. To become ardent, enthusiastic, or animated: began to warm to the subject.
3. To become kindly disposed or friendly: She felt the audience warming to her.
n. Informal
A warming or heating.
Phrasal Verb:
warm up
1. To prepare for an athletic event by exercising, stretching, or practicing for a short time beforehand.
2. To make or become ready for an event or operation.
3. To make more enthusiastic, excited, or animated.
4. To approach a state of confrontation or violence.

[Middle English, from Old English wearm.]

warm′er n.
warm′ish adj.
warm′ly adv.
warm′ness n.

warming

(ˈwɔːmɪŋ)
adj
(Cookery) having the effect of making people feel warmer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.warming - the process of becoming warmerwarming - the process of becoming warmer; a rising temperature
boiling - the application of heat to change something from a liquid to a gas
global warming - an increase in the average temperature of the earth's atmosphere (especially a sustained increase that causes climatic changes)
induction heating - the heating of a conducting material caused by an electric current induced in it
overheating - excessive heating
radiant heating - heating a building by radiation from panels containing hot water or electrical heaters
temperature change - a process whereby the degree of hotness of a body (or medium) changes
melt, melting, thaw, thawing - the process whereby heat changes something from a solid to a liquid; "the power failure caused a refrigerator melt that was a disaster"; "the thawing of a frozen turkey takes several hours"
2.warming - warm weather following a freezewarming - warm weather following a freeze; snow and ice melt; "they welcomed the spring thaw"
atmospheric condition, weather, weather condition, conditions - the atmospheric conditions that comprise the state of the atmosphere in terms of temperature and wind and clouds and precipitation; "they were hoping for good weather"; "every day we have weather conditions and yesterday was no exception"; "the conditions were too rainy for playing in the snow"
Adj.1.warming - imparting heatwarming - imparting heat; "a warming fire"  
warm - having or producing a comfortable and agreeable degree of heat or imparting or maintaining heat; "a warm body"; "a warm room"; "a warm climate"; "a warm coat"
2.warming - producing the sensation of heat when applied to the body; "a mustard plaster is calefacient"
hot - used of physical heat; having a high or higher than desirable temperature or giving off heat or feeling or causing a sensation of heat or burning; "hot stove"; "hot water"; "a hot August day"; "a hot stuffy room"; "she's hot and tired"; "a hot forehead"
Translations

warming

[ˈwɔːmɪŋ]
A. ADJ [drink] → que hace entrar en calor
B. N
1.recalentamiento m
see also global B
2. (o.f.) (= hiding) → zurra f
C. CPD warming pan Ncalentador m (de cama)
References in periodicals archive ?
MINNEAPOLIS -- The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) recently amended its guidelines for perioperative temperature management by changing the definition of active warming to include HotDog[R] patient warming.
ITEM: The Boston Globe for January 2 stated: "Polar bears are becoming canaries in the mine, warning of the consequences of global warming.
There, the scientists will sample the waters to learn how global warming is affecting the walruses, bearded seals, and other animals and plants in the area.
In response to global warming, or an increase in Earth's average temperature, animals and plants all over the planet are on the move (see Nuts & Bolts, p.
Earth's temperature rose about 1 degree Fahrenheit over the 20th century, but the rate of warming in the last 30 years is three times the average rate of warming for the last hundred years.
MAYBE it's because California has sweltered through a bake-oven summer, but global warming has shot up on the public's list of crucial election issues, even as a new poll shows Gov.
Because the average temperature at many Arctic locales hovers at or near the freezing point of water, even a small increase in local warming can have big consequences.
Heat stress is probably the most obvious thing people think of when the idea of global warming comes up.
THE UNITED Nations Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change claims to have found "new and stronger evidence that most of the observed warming over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities.
A new computer model indicates that soot--blackened, unburned carbon--is a major factor in global warming due to the greenhouse effect, a fact that traditional global warming models have failed to take into account.
We teach the basics of conditioning and warming up to the students in Levels One through Four in the first ten to fifteen minutes of each ballet class.
But a hard look at the evidence suggests that when it comes to what to do about global warming less may be more - and nothing may be best.