warranted


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war·rant

 (wôr′ənt, wŏr′-)
n.
1. An order that serves as authorization, especially:
a. Law A judicial writ authorizing the search or seizure of property, arrest of a person, or the execution of a legal judgment.
b. A voucher authorizing payment or receipt of money.
c. An option to buy stock at a specified price from an issuing company.
2.
a. Justification for an action or a belief; grounds: "The difficulty of predicting the future is no warrant to ignore it" (Brian Hayes).
b. Something that provides assurance or confirmation; a guarantee or proof: "The kind of uncertainties and ambiguities ... which may damage [his] essays ... are often a warrant of authenticity in [his] fiction" (John Edward Hardy).
3. Authorization or certification; sanction, as given by a superior.
4.
a. A warrant officer.
b. A certificate of appointment given to a warrant officer.
tr.v. war·rant·ed, war·rant·ing, war·rants
1. To provide adequate grounds for; justify or require: What could he have done that would warrant such a punishment?
2.
a. To guarantee (a product).
b. To guarantee (a purchaser) indemnification against damage or loss.
3. Law To guarantee clear title to (real property).

[Middle English warant, from Old North French, of Germanic origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

war′rant·a·bil′i·ty n.
war′rant·a·ble adj.
war′rant·a·bly adv.
war′rant·less adj.

warranted

(ˈwɒrəntɪd)
adj
justified
Translations

warranted

[ˈwɒrəntɪd] ADJ
1. (= justified) [action, remark] → justificado
that wasn't warranted!¡ese comentario está de sobra!
2. (Comm) [goods] → garantizado
"warranted 18 carat gold"certificado de oro de 18 quilates

warranted

[ˈwɒrəntɪd] adjjustifié(e)warrant officer n
(in army)adjudant(e) m/f; (in navy)premier-maître m

warranted

adj (= justifiable) fearsberechtigt

warranted

[ˈwɒrntɪd] adj (action, remark) → giustificato/a (Comm) (goods) → garantito/a
References in classic literature ?
It might even have occurred to them, that where a disposition to cavil prevailed, their neglect to execute the degree of power vested in them, and still more their recommendation of any measure whatever, not warranted by their commission, would not less excite animadversion, than a recommendation at once of a measure fully commensurate to the national exigencies.
The sum of what has been here advanced and proved is, that the charge against the convention of exceeding their powers, except in one instance little urged by the objectors, has no foundation to support it; that if they had exceeded their powers, they were not only warranted, but required, as the confidential servants of their country, by the circumstances in which they were placed, to exercise the liberty which they assume; and that finally, if they had violated both their powers and their obligations, in proposing a Constitution, this ought nevertheless to be embraced, if it be calculated to accomplish the views and happiness of the people of America.