warship


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war·ship

 (wôr′shĭp′)
n.
A combat ship. Also called man-of-war.

warship

(ˈwɔːˌʃɪp)
n
(Military) a vessel armed, armoured, and otherwise equipped for naval warfare

war•ship

(ˈwɔrˌʃɪp)

n.
a ship built or armed for combat purposes.
[1525–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.warship - a government ship that is available for waging warwarship - a government ship that is available for waging war
aircraft carrier, attack aircraft carrier, flattop, carrier - a large warship that carries planes and has a long flat deck for takeoffs and landings
battleship, battlewagon - large and heavily armoured warship
capital ship - a warship of the first rank in size and armament
conning tower - an armored pilothouse on a warship
corvette - a highly maneuverable escort warship; smaller than a destroyer
cruiser - a large fast warship; smaller than a battleship and larger than a destroyer
destroyer, guided missile destroyer - a small fast lightly armored but heavily armed warship
destroyer escort - warship smaller than a destroyer; designed to escort fleets or convoys
frigate - a United States warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
frigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
guard ship - a warship (at anchor or under way) required to maintain a higher degree of readiness than others in its squadron
ironclad - a wooden warship of the 19th century that is plated with iron or steel armor
man-of-war, ship of the line - a warship intended for combat
military vehicle - vehicle used by the armed forces
naval gun - naval weaponry consisting of a large gun carried on a warship
privateer - a privately owned warship commissioned to prey on the commercial shipping or warships of an enemy nation
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
sloop of war - a sailing or steam warship having cannons on only one deck
submersible warship, submersible - a warship designed to operate under water
surface ship - a warship that operates on the surface of the water
three-decker - a warship carrying guns on three decks
torpedo boat - small high-speed warship designed for torpedo attacks in coastal waters
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
fleet - a group of warships organized as a tactical unit
Translations
سَفينَه حَرْبِيَّه
krigsskib
sõjalaev
hadihajó
herskip
vojnová loď
vojna ladja
savaş gemisi

warship

[wɔːʃɪp] Nbuque m or barco m de guerra

warship

[ˈwɔːrʃɪp] nnavire m de guerre

warship

nKriegsschiff nt

warship

[ˈwɔːˌʃɪp] nnave f da guerra

war

(woː) noun
(an) armed struggle, especially between nations. Their leader has declared war on Britain; The larger army will win the war; the horrors of war; (also adjective) He is guilty of war crimes.
verbpast tense, past participle warred
to fight. The two countries have been warring constantly for generations.
ˈwarlike adjective
(negative unwarlike) fond of, or likely to begin, war. a warlike nation.
ˈwarrior (ˈwo-) noun
a soldier or skilled fighting man, especially in primitive societies. The chief of the tribe called his warriors together; (also adjective) a warrior prince.
war correspondent
a newspaper reporter who writes articles on a war especially from the scene of fighting.
ˈwar-cryplural ˈwar-cries noun
a shout used in battle as an encouragement to the soldiers. `For king and country' was the war-cry of the troops as they faced the enemy.
ˈwar-dance noun
a dance performed by the people of some primitive societies before going to war.
ˈwarfare noun
fighting, as in a war. He refused to fight, because he has religious objections to warfare.
ˈwarhead noun
the explosive section of a missile, torpedo etc. nuclear warheads.
ˈwarhorse noun
a horse used in battle.
ˈwarlord noun
a very powerful military leader.
ˈwarmonger noun
a person who encourages war(s), often for personal reasons.
ˈwarpaint noun
paint applied to the face etc by the people of some primitive societies before going into battle.
ˈwarship noun
a ship used in war or defence.
ˈwartime noun
the time during which a country, a people etc is at war. There is a great deal of hardship and misery in wartime; (also adjective) a wartime economy.
war of nerves
a war, contest etc in which each side tries to win by making the other nervous, eg by bluff, rather than by actually fighting. That game of chess was a war of nerves.
References in classic literature ?
Scarcely had he alighted than the guy ropes were simultaneous released, and the great warship, lightened by the removal of the loot, soared majestically into the air, her decks and upper works a mass of roaring flames.
Nothing comparable to this state of affairs had been known in the previous history of warfare, unless we take such a case as that of a nineteenth century warship attacking some large savage or barbaric settlement, or one of those naval bombardments that disfigure the history of Great Britain in the late eighteenth century.
As the warship, bearing Astok back to the court of his father, turned toward the west, Thuvia of Ptarth, sitting upon the same bench where the Prince of Dusar had affronted her, watched the twinkling lights of the craft growing smaller in the distance.
The day before they sighted Jungle Island and discovered the little land-locked harbour upon the bosom of which the Cowrie now rode quietly at anchor, the watch had discovered the smoke and funnels of a warship upon the southern horizon.
After our encounter with the first warship I had given instructions that a wireless message be sent out explaining our predicament; but to my chagrin I discovered that both sending and receiving instruments had disappeared.
Bime by, close up, big fella warship stop 'm along Su'u, knock seven balls outa Su'u.
It gives us some idea of the high place Sir Walter had won for himself in the hearts of the people, when we learn that his health seemed a national concern, and that a warship was sent to take him on his journey.
They tell me there's a Spanish galleon there, and a Dutch warship, besides a score or more of fishing-boats.
We had a steamboat or two on the Thames, we had steam warships, and the beginnings of a steam commercial marine; I was getting ready to send out an expedition to discover America.
Several years later he established a shipbuilding plant near Boston, which grew until it employed four thousand workmen and had built half a dozen warships for the United States Navy.
The town itself is a famous old place, dating from the dim days of King Ethelred, when the Danes anchored their warships in the Kennet, and started from Reading to ravage all the land of Wessex; and here Ethelred and his brother Alfred fought and defeated them, Ethelred doing the praying and Alfred the fighting.
The warships drew past, casting a curious effect of discipline and sadness upon the waters, and it was not until they were again invisible that people spoke to each other naturally.