wastepaper

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waste·pa·per

 (wāst′pā′pər)
n.
Discarded paper.

wastepaper

(ˈweɪstˌpeɪpə)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) paper discarded after use

waste•pa•per

(ˈweɪstˌpeɪ pər)

n.
paper discarded as useless.
[1575–85]
Translations

wastepaper

[ˈweɪstˌpeɪpəʳ] ncartaccia
References in classic literature ?
How the other pen found its way into the bowl instead of the fireplace or wastepaper basket I can't imagine, but there the two were, lying side by side, both encrusted with ink and completely undistinguishable from each other.
Telegrams followed, which he threw into the wastepaper basket.
He did not recognize his room, looking up from the ground, at the bent legs of the table, at the wastepaper basket, and the tiger-skin rug.
Vesey from Blackwater Park, it was given to me without the envelope, which had been thrown into the wastepaper basket, and long since destroyed.
The pretreated wastepapers were converted into fermentable sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis.
The wastepaper which accounts for more than 35 per cent of the total lignocellulosic waste of the municipal solid waste could be a potential feedstock for value-added products due to its rich cellulose content, researchers in Oman have found.
With the help of the grant received from The Research Council, Dr Sivakumar Nallusamy, assistant professor at the Department of Biology, Sultan Qaboos University, and his team successfully converted the wastepaper into commercially valuable products.
Tenders are invited for E Tender For Annual Rate Contract For Disposal Of Wastepapers Sweepings
He also added that he threw all the wastepapers and gave a part of his library to the
Since the mid-1970's, new types of paper balers-the chief piece of processing machinery-automatically bind bundles of compressed wastepaper with wire bands and are usually flush mounted into the floor of the processing facility, which allows for easier loading of loose wastepapers.
Since 1982, improvements in processing technologies and machinery as well as continued strong demand for scrap metal and wastepaper contributed to above-average productivity gains.