water flea

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water flea

n.
1. Any of various small chiefly freshwater branchiopod crustaceans of the order Cladocera, having a bivalve carapace and typically swimming with jerking flealike motions, and including the daphnias. Also called cladoceran.
2. Any of various other small aquatic crustaceans, such as some copepods, that swim with a similar motion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

water flea

n
(Animals) any of numerous minute freshwater branchiopod crustaceans of the order Cladocera, which swim by means of hairy branched antennae. See also daphnia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wa′ter flea`


n.
any tiny freshwater branchiopod crustacean of the order Cladocera, as the daphnia.
[1575–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

water flea

Any of various small aquatic crustaceans, mostly of microscopic size, having especially long antennae that are used for swimming. Water fleas are an important source of food for many fish.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.water flea - minute free-swimming freshwater copepod having a large median eye and pear-shaped body and long antennae used in swimmingwater flea - minute free-swimming freshwater copepod having a large median eye and pear-shaped body and long antennae used in swimming; important in some food chains and as intermediate hosts of parasitic worms that affect man e.g. Guinea worms
copepod, copepod crustacean - minute marine or freshwater crustaceans usually having six pairs of limbs on the thorax; some abundant in plankton and others parasitic on fish
genus Cyclops - copepod water fleas
2.water flea - minute freshwater crustacean having a round body enclosed in a transparent shellwater flea - minute freshwater crustacean having a round body enclosed in a transparent shell; moves about like a flea by means of hairy branched antennae
branchiopod, branchiopod crustacean, branchiopodan - aquatic crustaceans typically having a carapace and many pairs of leaflike appendages used for swimming as well as respiration and feeding
genus Daphnia - water fleas
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Short-term environmental safety studies have also found that many nanomaterials adsorb (form a thin film) on the surface of the epidermises of organisms such as algae and water fleas.
If you already have green water, pop to an aquatic garden centre for a jar of water fleas. They feed on the blanketweed algae that turn new, mineral rich, tap water ponds green.
"In at least five independent measurements of the mutation rate--in humans, roundworms, fruit flies, water fleas, and yeast--the evolutionary model failed to predict modern DNA differences.
The worm infects a mammal when larvae or larvae ingested by water fleas are consumed through contaminated water.
Adult females eventually emerge from painful blisters at the extremities to lay eggs in stagnant water, where offspring will infect water fleas and begin the cycle anew.
The larvae are ingested by cyclopoid copepods (water fleas) that act as intermediate hosts of the parasite.
o Wipe out Guinea worm, which is transmitted through dirty water containing water fleas
Or maybe some water fleas? Well that's exactly what six youngsters from Rhondda Cynon Taf are doing as part of an experiment to win Mission Discovery 2013.
Female water fleas typically release a brood of offspring each time they molt (shed their exoskeleton).
Specific instances of the latter are the prolific breeding of copepods and water fleas as insurance for the few, armour against attack epitomised in the larger Crustacea, and the use of specialised refuges.
Once they arrive at the ISS, astronauts will carry out regular observations of the water fleas, recording their behaviour each day by noting down movement patterns and taking photographs.