bleeding

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bleed·ing

 (blē′dĭng)
adj. & adv. Chiefly British Slang
Used as an intensive.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bleeding

(ˈbliːdɪŋ)
adj, adv
(intensifier): a bleeding fool; it's bleeding beautiful.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bleed•ing

(ˈbli dɪŋ)
adv.
Brit. Slang. (used as an intensifier): a bleeding silly idea.
[1175–1225]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bleeding - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vesselbleeding - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vessel
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
haemorrhagic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke - stroke caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain
cerebral hemorrhage - bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel in the brain
blood extravasation - the leakage of blood from a vessel into tissues surrounding it; can occur in injuries or burns or allergic reactions
hyphema - bleeding into the interior chamber of the eye
metrorrhagia - bleeding from the uterus that is not due to menstruation; usually indicative of disease (as cervical cancer)
epistaxis, nosebleed - bleeding from the nose
ulemorrhagia - bleeding of the gums
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نَزْفٌ
krvácejícíkrvácení
blødning
blæîandi
sangramento
kanayan

bleeding

[ˈbliːdɪŋ]
A. ADJ
1. [wound etc] → sangrante (fig) [heart] → dolorido
2. (Brit) → condenado, puñetero
B. ADV (Brit) bleeding awkwardcondenadamente difícil
C. N (= medical procedure) → sangría f; (= blood loss) → desangramiento m, hemorragia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bleeding

[ˈbliːdɪŋ]
n (internal, menstrual)saignement m; (more serious)hémorragie f
adj (British)maudit(e) before nbleeding edge n (= cutting edge) → avant-garde fbleeding-edge [ˌbliːdɪŋˈɛdʒ] modif (= cutting-edge) [technology] → de pointebleeding heart bleeding-heart [ˌbliːdɪŋˈhɑːrt]
nâme f sensible
adj [conservative, leftist, sentimentalist, sentimentalism] → plein(e) de bons sentiments bleeding-heart liberalbleeding-heart liberal nlibéral m au cœur tendre, libéral m au grand cœur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bleeding

n
(= loss of blood)Blutung f; internal bleedinginnere Blutungen pl
(= taking blood)Aderlass m
(of plant)Blutung f, → Schwitzen nt
(of brakes)Lüftung f
adj
wound, nose, gumsblutend; (fig) heartgebrochen
(Brit inf) → verdammt (inf), → Scheiß- (inf); (in positive sense) miracle etcverdammt (inf); get your bleeding hands offnimm deine Dreckpfoten weg (inf)
adv (Brit inf) → verdammt (inf); that’s bleeding marvellousdas ist ja wieder toll! (inf), → na klasse! (inf); who does he/she think he/she bleeding well is?für was hält sich der Kerl/die Kuh eigentlich? (inf); not bleeding likelywohl kaum (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bleeding

[ˈbliːdɪŋ]
1. adj
a. (wound, person) → sanguinante
bleeding gums → le gengive che sanguinano
b. (Brit) (fam) → dannato/a, maledetto/a
you bleeding idiot! → pezzo di cretino!
2. nperdita di sangue; (serious) → emorragia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bleed

(bliːd) past tense, past participle bled (bled) verb
to lose blood. Her nose was bleeding badly.
ˈbleeding adjective
losing blood. a bleeding wound.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

bleed·ing

n. sangrado, hemorragia;
___ disorderstrastornos hemorrágicos;
___ from an arteryhemorragia arterial;
___ from the vagina___ vaginal;
___ from the nose___ por la nariz, epistaxis;
___ pileshemorroides;
___ tendencydiátesis hemorrágica;
___ rectalrectorrhagia;
life threatening ___hemorragia con peligro mortal.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

bleeding

adj sangrante; — ulcer úlcera sangrante; n hemorragia, sangrado; dysfunctional uterine — hemorragia uterina disfuncional; menstrual — sangrado menstrual
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Ere long this dampness became water, and that water gained so rapidly that it had soon mounted to Joe's waist.
In addition to determining plantation specifications and net water gain, another outcome of the project is expected to be carbon mitigation, helping the UAE achieve the climate objectives and CO2 reduction requirements of the Paris Agreement
However, Bales notes, recent research indicates that some of this potential water gain from thinning would be lost to higher rates of evapotranspiration as the climate warms.
Water Gain Plantongs is two tools in one--the top end is a spade for digging a hole and the bottom is a pair of tongs that allows the plant to be removed from its plastic tray.
Equation (5) can be rewritten for the case of the water gain rate received in terms of effective diffusion coefficient ([D.sub.eff]).
The virtual water-flows in the international economy are measured as net water gain or net water loss in global water-use efficiency.
Among these stability skills are searching out low-fat or low-calorie foods that taste as good as high-fat/high-calorie options to avoid feelings of deprivation; occasionally eating and savouring small amounts of favourite high-fat/high-calorie foods; weighing daily to see how their body weight naturally fluctuates from day to day; identifying a personalized weight-fluctuation range of about 5 pounds to account for common disruptions, such as water gain and vacations; strategically losing a few pounds before a known disruption like a vacation to minimize its effects; and eating a little more when reaching the lower limit of the personalized 5-pound range.
The area is also immersed in clouds on a daily basis, and dew deposition may contribute the same amount of water gain, as well as shielding plants from solar radiation.
Fluids and food are the major sources of water gain. A small amount is produced by metabolic processes, primarily carbohydrate metabolism.
[a] Moisture Specific Water gain Mineral spirit content gravity (5 mm.) (20 sec.) (%) (%) Normal average 11 (0.2) 0.42 (0.07) 16.7 (6.6) 7.3 (2.1) Permeable average 10.8 (1.6) 0.40 (0.08) 31.4 (15.3) 73.9 (13.9) Pressure drop, Pressure drop, longitudinal transverse Normal average 100 (0) 100 (0) Permeable average 13.2 (13.6) 38.0 (21.6) (a.)Values represent means of 16 and 20 samples for normal and high permability respectively, and values in parentheses represent one standard deviation.
When the laminates were aged in 71[degrees]C water, the time to equilibrium water gain increased with the addition of rubber in the matrix.