waterhole

(redirected from waterholes)
Translations
حُفْرَة مائِيَّه، بِئْر ماء
vesikuoppa
víztócsa
vatnsból

waterhole

[ˈwɔːtəhəʊl] Ncharco m; (for animals) → abrevadero m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

water

(ˈwoːtə) noun
a colourless, transparent liquid compound of hydrogen and oxygen, having no taste or smell, which turns to steam when boiled and to ice when frozen. She drank two glasses of water; `Are you going swimming in the sea?' `No, the water's too cold'; Each bedroom in the hotel is supplied with hot and cold running water; (also adjective) The plumber had to turn off the water supply in order to repair the pipe; transport by land and water.
verb
1. to supply with water. He watered the plants.
2. (of the mouth) to produce saliva. His mouth watered at the sight of all the food.
3. (of the eyes) to fill with tears. The dense smoke made his eyes water.
ˈwaters noun plural
a body of water such as the sea, a river etc. the stormy waters of the bay.
ˈwatery adjective
1. like water; diluted. a watery fluid.
2. (of eyes) full of fluid eg because of illness, cold winds etc.
3. (of a colour) pale. eyes of a watery blue.
ˈwateriness noun

water boatman

a water insect with oarlike back legs that propel it through the water.
ˈwaterborne adjective
carried or transmitted by water. Typhoid is a waterborne disease.
ˈwater-closet noun
(abbreviation WC (dabljuˈsiː) ) a lavatory.
ˈwater-colour noun
a type of paint which is thinned with water instead of with oil.
ˈwatercress noun
a herb which grows in water and is often used in salads.
ˈwaterfall noun
a natural fall of water from a height such as a rock or a cliff.
ˈwaterfowl noun or noun plural
a bird or birds which live on or beside water.
ˈwaterfront noun
that part of a town etc which faces the sea or a lake. He lives on the waterfront.
ˈwaterhole noun
a spring or other place where water can be found in a desert or other dry country. The elephant drank from the waterhole.
ˈwatering-can noun
a container used when watering plants.
water level
the level of the surface of a mass of water. The water level in the reservoir is sinking/rising.
ˈwaterlilyplural ˈwaterlilies noun
a water plant with broad flat floating leaves.
ˈwaterlogged adjective
(of ground) soaked in water.
water main
a large underground pipe carrying a public water supply.
ˈwater-melon
a type of melon with green skin and red flesh.
ˈwaterproof adjective
not allowing water to soak through. waterproof material.
noun
a coat made of waterproof material. She was wearing a waterproof.
verb
to make (material) waterproof.
ˈwatershed noun
an area of high land from which rivers flow in different directions into different basins.
ˈwater-skiing noun
the sport of skiing on water, towed by a motor-boat.
ˈwater-ski verb
ˈwatertight adjective
made in such a way that water cannot pass through.
water vapour
water in the form of a gas, produced by evaporation.
ˈwaterway noun
a channel, eg a canal or river, along which ships can sail.
ˈwaterwheel noun
a wheel moved by water to work machinery etc.
ˈwaterworks noun singular or plural
a place in which water is purified and stored before distribution to an area.
hold water
to be convincing. His explanation won't hold water.
in(to) deep water
in(to) trouble or danger. I got into deep water during that argument.
water down
to dilute. This milk has been watered down.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
But most vivid of all, Saxon saw the fight at Little Meadow--and Daisy, dressed as for a gala day, in white, a ribbon sash about her waist, ribbons and a round-comb in her hair, in her hands small water-pails, step forth into the sunshine on the flower-grown open ground from the wagon circle, wheels interlocked, where the wounded screamed their delirium and babbled of flowing fountains, and go on, through the sunshine and the wonder-inhibition of the bullet-dealing Indians, a hundred yards to the waterhole and back again.
The kid was tethered to a stake beside the waterhole.
BABOONS AT MOST AFRICAN WATERHOLES ARE HYPER WARY AND NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO TAKE WITH BOW.
My best fortune on sage grouse happens within a half-mile radius of waterholes. Last season, I located such a waterhole in an otherwise dry patch of Wyoming high desert.
Some waterholes are dry, but we've got treestands on others that are seeing lots of deer visits each day."
Imagine what those prairie waterholes would look like.
This is midwinter in Africa, the dry season, when animals flock to waterholes. The stage is set.
Eventually we discovered blinding-in at waterholes, and our success rate improved.
Great pop-up blinds by Double Bull and others will routinely produce trophy bucks near waterholes. Pronghorns quickly become accustomed to such structures.
For do-it-yourself hunters venturing into new territory, waterholes may be the surest route to a variety of big game.
Thirsty deer generally visit waterholes every evening.