wave off


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wave

 (wāv)
v. waved, wav·ing, waves
v.intr.
1. To move freely back and forth or up and down in the air, as branches in the wind.
2. To make a signal with an up-and-down or back-and-forth movement of the hand or an object held in the hand: waved as she drove by.
3. To have an undulating or wavy form; curve or curl: Her hair waves naturally.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move back and forth or up and down, either once or repeatedly: She waved a fan before her face.
2.
a. To move or swing as in giving a signal: He waved his hand. See Synonyms at flourish.
b. To signal or express by waving the hand or an object held in the hand: We waved goodbye.
c. To signal (a person) by using the hand to move in a specified direction: The police officer waved the motorist into the right lane.
3. To arrange into curves, curls, or undulations: wave one's hair.
n.
1.
a. A ridge or swell moving through or along the surface of a large body of water.
b. A small ridge or swell moving across the interface of two fluids and dependent on surface tension.
2. often waves The sea: vanished beneath the waves.
3. Something that suggests the form and motion of a wave in the sea, especially:
a. A moving curve or succession of curves in or on a surface; an undulation: waves of wheat in the wind.
b. A curve or succession of curves, as in the hair.
c. A curved shape, outline, or pattern.
4. A movement up and down or back and forth: a wave of the hand.
5.
a. A surge or rush, as of sensation: a wave of nausea; a wave of indignation.
b. A sudden great rise, as in activity or intensity: a wave of panic selling on the stock market.
c. A rising trend that involves large numbers of individuals: a wave of conservatism.
d. One of a succession of mass movements: the first wave of settlers.
e. A maneuver in which fans at a sports event simulate an ocean wave by rising quickly in sequence with arms upraised and then quickly sitting down again in a continuous rolling motion.
6. A widespread, persistent meteorological condition, especially of temperature: a heat wave.
7. Physics
a. A disturbance that travels through a medium. Energy is transferred by a wave from one region of the medium to another without causing any permanent displacement of the medium.
b. A graphic representation of the variation of such a disturbance with time.
c. A single cycle of a periodic wave.
Phrasal Verb:
wave off
1. To dismiss or refuse by waving the hand or arm: waved off his invitation to join the group.
2. Sports To cancel or nullify by waving the arms, usually from a crossed position: waved off the goal because time had run out.

[Middle English waven, from Old English wafian; see webh- in Indo-European roots.]

wav′er n.

Wave

 (wāv)
n.
A member of the women's reserve of the US Navy, organized during World War II, but now no longer a separate branch.

[From W(omen) A(ccepted for) V(olunteer) E(mergency Service).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wave off - dismiss as insignificantwave off - dismiss as insignificant; "He waved off suggestions of impropriety"
background, play down, downplay - understate the importance or quality of; "he played down his royal ancestry"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"Then wull you be thunkun' thot God thot directs the stars un their courses, an' tull whose mighty foot the world uz but a footstool, wull you be thunkun' thot He wull take a spite again' Margaret Henan an' send a bug wave off the Cape tull wash her son un tull eternity, all because she was for namun' hum Samuel?"
The post Pensioner dies after being hit by large wave off Larnaca appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Running for cash Head teacher of St Mary's Primary, Raploch, Karl Kicinski gets ready in May, 1994, to wave off pupils lining up for a sponsored fun round the school's football field.
Organised by the Rotary Club of Inverness Loch Ness, entrants are hoping for sunshine and clear skies, with spectators more than welcome to wave off the drivers as they leave from Inverness.
Steve Heapy, CEO of Jet2.com and Jet2holidays said: "We were delighted to wave off the full flight as it departed to the Turkish sunshine.
ON A WARM WEDNESDAY morning near the end of May, large crowds of 'suspiciously smiling' parents gathered outside of school to wave off a bustling coach of children, their destination - Kingswood Activity Centre.
The Queen, Prince Philip and other close members of the Royal Family wave off the couple as Harry salutes 2.
The 38-year-old surfer received the title 'Largest wave surfed (unlimited)' from Guinness World Records on May 1 for his achievement in surfing a 24.38-meter or 80-foot wave off the coast of Nazare, Portugal, back in Nov.