wavery


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wavery

(ˈweɪvərɪ)
adj
characterized by unsteadiness or wavering
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The only time we wished for a more emphatic approach was when some choruses began with slightly wavery attack, but this mattered very little within the overall context of this buoyant performance.
Her birthmark seemed to tremble some, to ripple with a wavery light, and her eyes filled with burning.
But in the last years of his life, what with heart failure and personality changes and probably a series of small strokes, his handwriting became wavery and illegible; it crept diagonally down the page like a spider.
He's almost as tall as me, his feet a size bigger, and his voice is doing that cracked, broken wavery thing when he laughs.
A sign on the powder room toilet, the Palmer Method quaking and wavery, read, "Does not work."
The 21-year-old Gomez, who once dated (is still dating?) Justin Bieber, is the quintessential Disney discovery who shot to fame with hit series such as Wizards Of Wavery Place and films such as Jonas Brothers: Living the Dream.
Thus, the reader encounters "turrety", "The air was Magellan air.", "groggling", "rubbled", "wavery", "sweatery", "globby", and "caramelly, coconutty, chocolaty", some understandable, others not.
Here's how writer Roger Brooks conveyed the beginning of their conversation: "You're going to have to slow down and talk louder, son," says the wavery voice on the other end of the phone.
As she reluctantly resumes the dating scene, Wavery's personal and professional lives seem to be in perpetual (and occasionally embarrassing) conflict.
It is the one unshakable constant in the wavery flux of