waxworks


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wax·work

 (wăks′wûrk′)
n.
1. The art of modeling in wax.
2. A figure made of wax, especially a life-size wax effigy of a famous person.
3. waxworks(used with a sing. or pl. verb) An exhibition of wax figures in a museum.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wax•works

(ˈwæksˌwɜrks)

n., pl. -works. (usu. used with a sing. v.)
an exhibition of or a museum for displaying wax figures.
[1690–1700]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُتْحَف تَماثيل الشَّمْع
vokskabinet
panoptikum
vaxmyndasÿning
bal mumu heykel/mumya müzesi

waxworks

[ˈwækswɜːks] N (pl) (waxworks) → museo m de cera
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

waxworks

[ˈwækswɜːrks] n (= museum) → musée m de cire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

waxworks

[ˈwæksˌwɜːks] nsg or plmuseo delle cere
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

wax1

(wӕks) noun
1. the sticky, fatty substance of which bees make their cells; beeswax.
2. the sticky, yellowish substance formed in the ears.
3. a manufactured, fatty substance used in polishing, to give a good shine. furniture wax.
4. (also adjective) (also ˈcandle-wax) (of) a substance made from paraffin, used in making candles, models etc, that melts when heated. a wax model.
5. sealing-wax.
verb
to smear, polish or rub with wax.
waxed adjective
having a coating of wax. waxed paper.
ˈwaxen, ˈwaxy adjective
ˈwaxwork noun
a wax model (usually of a well-known person).
ˈwaxworks noun plural
an exhibition of such models.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
They sat rather like a very superior lot of waxworks, with the fixed but indetermined facial expression and with that odd air wax figures have of being aware of their existence being but a sham.
The author who, after the fashion of "The North American Review," should be upon all occasions merely "quiet," must necessarily upon many occasions be simply silly, or stupid; and has no more right to be considered "easy" or "natural" than a Cockney exquisite, or than the sleeping Beauty in the waxworks.
Once, I had been taken to see some ghastly waxwork at the Fair, representing I know not what impossible personage lying in state.
The scale of wickedness allowed to the waxwork British lady is most charmingly graduated.
A many, many, beautiful corpses she laid out, as nice and neat as waxwork. My old eyes have seen them--ay, and those old hands touched them too; for I have helped her, scores of times.'
Freely's peculiar regard, and conquered his fastidiousness; and no wonder, for the Ideal, as exhibited in the finest waxwork, was perhaps never so closely approached by the Real as in the person of the pretty Penelope.
It looked as if we'd stuck up a waxwork instead of a statue in the centre of our garden.
But I found no sign of him in the empty street, and no sign in the Earl's Court Road, that looked as empty for all its length, save for a natural enemy standing like a waxwork figure with a glimmer at his belt.
This was a full-blown, very plump damsel, fair as waxwork, with handsome and regular features, languishing blue eyes, and ringleted yellow hair.
Almost above the man looking at the camera's head is the sign for D'Arc's waxworks exhibition later known as Cardiff Continental Waxworks IT'S hard for me to believe that it is now more than 70 years ago that my beloved late sister Valerie used to take me to the Cardiff Continental Waxworks at 90 St Mary Street.
Crowds gathered at O'Connell Bridge for the unveiling by Dublin's National Waxworks Plus Museum before the Popemobile took to the streets with models of three pontiffs on board.
Waxworks' biggest success to date came in February, when it reissued the long-unavailable Ennlo Morricone score to director John Carpenter's horror masterpiece The Thing.