waylay


Also found in: Thesaurus.

way·lay

 (wā′lā′)
tr.v. way·laid (-lād′), way·lay·ing, way·lays
1. To lie in wait for and attack from ambush. See Synonyms at ambush.
2. To approach and speak to (a person on the way to a destination or in the middle of an activity): "After the meal he followed me into the living room and waylaid me before I could reassemble my guests" (Louis Auchincloss).
3. To interrupt the course or progress of: travelers waylaid by a storm; an athlete waylaid by an injury.

way′lay′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

waylay

(weɪˈleɪ)
vb (tr) , -lays, -laying or -laid
1. to lie in wait for and attack
2. to await and intercept unexpectedly
[C16: from way + lay1]
wayˈlayer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

way•lay

(ˈweɪˌleɪ, weɪˈleɪ)

v.t. -laid, -lay•ing.
1. to intercept or attack from ambush, as in order to rob, seize, or slay.
2. to await and accost unexpectedly.
[1505–15; way1 + lay1, after Middle Low German, Middle Dutch wegelagen to lie in wait, derivative of wegelage a lying in wait]
way′lay`er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

waylay


Past participle: waylaid
Gerund: waylaying

Imperative
waylay
waylay
Present
I waylay
you waylay
he/she/it waylays
we waylay
you waylay
they waylay
Preterite
I waylaid
you waylaid
he/she/it waylaid
we waylaid
you waylaid
they waylaid
Present Continuous
I am waylaying
you are waylaying
he/she/it is waylaying
we are waylaying
you are waylaying
they are waylaying
Present Perfect
I have waylaid
you have waylaid
he/she/it has waylaid
we have waylaid
you have waylaid
they have waylaid
Past Continuous
I was waylaying
you were waylaying
he/she/it was waylaying
we were waylaying
you were waylaying
they were waylaying
Past Perfect
I had waylaid
you had waylaid
he/she/it had waylaid
we had waylaid
you had waylaid
they had waylaid
Future
I will waylay
you will waylay
he/she/it will waylay
we will waylay
you will waylay
they will waylay
Future Perfect
I will have waylaid
you will have waylaid
he/she/it will have waylaid
we will have waylaid
you will have waylaid
they will have waylaid
Future Continuous
I will be waylaying
you will be waylaying
he/she/it will be waylaying
we will be waylaying
you will be waylaying
they will be waylaying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been waylaying
you have been waylaying
he/she/it has been waylaying
we have been waylaying
you have been waylaying
they have been waylaying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been waylaying
you will have been waylaying
he/she/it will have been waylaying
we will have been waylaying
you will have been waylaying
they will have been waylaying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been waylaying
you had been waylaying
he/she/it had been waylaying
we had been waylaying
you had been waylaying
they had been waylaying
Conditional
I would waylay
you would waylay
he/she/it would waylay
we would waylay
you would waylay
they would waylay
Past Conditional
I would have waylaid
you would have waylaid
he/she/it would have waylaid
we would have waylaid
you would have waylaid
they would have waylaid
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.waylay - wait in hiding to attackwaylay - wait in hiding to attack    
wait - stay in one place and anticipate or expect something; "I had to wait on line for an hour to get the tickets"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

waylay

verb
1. attack, surprise, hold up, ambush, set upon, lie in wait for, catch The trucks are being waylaid by bandits.
2. accost, stop, intercept, pounce on, swoop down on He was forever waylaying me for chats in the corridor.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

waylay

verb
To attack suddenly and without warning:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَتَرَبَّص
sitja fyrir
uzbrukt no slēpņauzglūnēt
yolunu kesmek

waylay

[weɪˈleɪ] (waylaid (pt, pp)) [weɪˈleɪd] VTabordar, detener
I was waylaid by the managerme detuvo el gerente
they were waylaid by thievesles atacaron unos ladrones
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

waylay

[ˌweɪˈleɪ] vt
(= attack) → attaquer
(= intercept to speak to sb) → aborder
I got waylaid → j'ai été retardé
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

waylay

[weɪˈleɪ] (waylaid (pt, pp)) vt (old) → intercettare
I got waylaid (fig) → ho avuto un contrattempo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

waylay

(weiˈlei) past tense, past participle wayˈlaid verb
to ambush. He was waylaid by a crowd of angry demonstrators.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
To waylay and harass a band of trappers with their pack-horses, when embarrassed in the rugged defiles of the mountains, has become as favorite an exploit with these Indians as the plunder of a caravan to the Arab of the desert.
I failed to find Lord Hilton at his house, but I was told he was expected from London by the six o'clock train from Waterloo; and as it was then about a quarter past five, I went home, had some tea, and walked up to the station to waylay him.
She would waylay him in the street and, knowing she had been waiting about for him to come out of the hospital for a couple of hours, he would give her a few charming, friendly words and bolt off with the excuse that he had a business engagement.