wayside


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way·side

 (wā′sīd′)
n.
The side or edge of a road, way, path, or highway.
adj.
Situated at or near the side of a road, way, path, or highway: a wayside inn.
Idioms:
fall by the wayside
1. To fail to continue; give up.
2. To be set aside or discarded because of other considerations.
go by the wayside
To be set aside or discarded because of other considerations.

wayside

(ˈweɪˌsaɪd)
n
1. (Automotive Engineering)
a. the side or edge of a road
b. (modifier) situated by the wayside: a wayside inn.
2. fall by the wayside to cease or fail to continue doing something: of the nine starters, three fell by the wayside.
3. go by the wayside to be put aside on account of something more urgent

way•side

(ˈweɪˌsaɪd)

n.
1. the side of the way; land immediately adjacent to a road, highway, etc.; roadside.
adj.
2. located at or along the wayside: a wayside inn.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wayside - edge of a way or road or pathwayside - edge of a way or road or path; "flowers along the wayside"
edge - the outside limit of an object or area or surface; a place farthest away from the center of something; "the edge of the leaf is wavy"; "she sat on the edge of the bed"; "the water's edge"
way - any artifact consisting of a road or path affording passage from one place to another; "he said he was looking for the way out"
Translations
جانِب الطَّريق
vejside
vegarkantur; sem er viî/nálægt vegi
yol kenarı

wayside

[ˈweɪsaɪd]
A. Nborde m del camino
by the waysideal borde del camino
to fall by the wayside [project] → quedarse en aguas de borraja; [person] → quedarse a mitad de camino
B. CPD [inn] → de carretera; [flowers] → al borde del camino

wayside

[ˈweɪsaɪd] n
(= roadside) → bord m de la route
to fall by the wayside (= give up) → abandonner (= be abandoned) → être abandonné(e)way station n
(= railway station) (US)gare f
(= stopping point on journey) → étape f

wayside

[ˈweɪˌsaɪd]
1. nbordo della strada
along the wayside, by the wayside → sul ciglio della strada
to fall by the wayside (fig) → perdersi lungo la strada
2. adj (flowers, cafè) → sul bordo della strada

way

(wei) noun
1. an opening or passageway. This is the way in/out; There's no way through.
2. a route, direction etc. Which way shall we go?; Which is the way to Princes Street?; His house is on the way from here to the school; Will you be able to find your/the way to my house?; Your house is on my way home; The errand took me out of my way; a motorway.
3. used in the names of roads. His address is 21 Melville Way.
4. a distance. It's a long way to the school; The nearest shops are only a short way away.
5. a method or manner. What is the easiest way to write a book?; I know a good way of doing it; He's got a funny way of talking; This is the quickest way to chop onions.
6. an aspect or side of something. In some ways this job is quite difficult; In a way I feel sorry for him.
7. a characteristic of behaviour; a habit. He has some rather unpleasant ways.
8. used with many verbs to give the idea of progressing or moving. He pushed his way through the crowd; They soon ate their way through the food.
adverb
(especially American) by a long distance or time; far. The winner finished the race way ahead of the other competitors; It's way past your bedtime.
ˈwayfarer noun
a traveller, especially on foot.
ˈwayside noun
the side of a road, path etc. We can stop by the wayside and have a picnic; (also adjective) a wayside inn.
be/get on one's way
to start or continue a walk, journey etc. Well, thanks for the cup of tea, but I must be on my way now.
by the way
incidentally, in passing, while I remember etc. By the way, did you know he was getting married?
fall by the wayside
(of projects, ideas etc) to be abandoned; to fail.
get/have one's own way
to do, get etc what one wants. You can't always have your own way.
get into / out of the way of (doing) something
to become accustomed to (not) doing; to get into / out of the habit of doing. They got into the way of waking up late when they were on holiday.
go out of one's way
to do more than is really necessary. He went out of his way to help us.
have a way with
to be good at dealing with or managing. She has a way with children.
have it one's own way
to get one's own way. Oh, have it your own way – I'm tired of arguing.
in a bad way
unwell; in poor condition. The patient is in a bad way.
in/out of the/someone's way
(not) blocking someone's progress, or occupying space that is needed by someone. Don't leave your bicycle where it will get in the way of pedestrians; Will I be in the/your way if I work at this table?; `Get out of my way!' he said rudely.
lose one's way
to stop knowing where one is, or in which direction one ought to be going. I lost my way through the city.
make one's way
1. to go. They made their way towards the centre of the town.
2. to get on in the world.
make way (for)
to stand aside and leave room (for). The crowd parted to make way for the ambulance.
under way
moving, in progress etc. Her plans are under way.
way of life
a manner of spending one's life. I enjoy farming – it's a pleasant way of life.
ways and means
methods, especially of providing money.
References in classic literature ?
They do not grow weary nor miss step, nor do they fall out of rank and sink by the wayside to be left contemplating the moving procession.
After sauntering along for some time he discovered the Hare by the wayside, apparently asleep, and seeing a chance to win pushed on as fast as he could, arriving at the goal hours afterward, suffering from extreme fatigue and claiming the victory.
Very tired," replied Pride, seating himself on a stone by the wayside and mopping his steaming brow.
But outsiders, you know, often see most of the game; and sitting in my arbor by the wayside, smoking my hookah of contentment and eating the sweet lotus-leaves of indolence, I can look out musingly upon the whirling throng that rolls and tumbles past me on the great high-road of life.
The longer they looked the more did this elderly couple feel interested in the unknown youth, to whom the wayside and the maple shade were as a secret chamber, with the rich gloom of damask curtains brooding over him.
In those days folk still believed in witches and trembled at a curse; and this one, falling so pat, like a wayside omen, to arrest me ere I carried out my purpose, took the pith out of my legs.
To walk from morning to evening by her side, to minister to her moods, to provide such entertainment as I might for her brain, and watch like a father over her physical needs; to note when she was weary and too proud to show it, and to pretend to be done up myself; to choose for her the easiest path, and keep my eyes open for wayside flowers and every country surprise,--these, and a hundred other atten- tions, kept my heart and mind in busy service.
The humblest wayside juggler in India could mystify them to the verge of lunacy.
But, with your favor, friend, I must gather my arrows again, for while a shaft costs a penny a poor man can scarce leave them sticking in wayside stumps.
In the interesting land of India, where snakes abound and scorpions are common objects of the wayside, a native who has had the misfortune to be bitten by one of the latter pursues an admirably common-sense plan.
He turned from the little country station to walk in the woods by the wayside until his own train should be leaving, and from time to time he threw himself under a tree to think and dream and look at the glory of the foliage.
At last I could go no further; I was exhausted with the violence of my emotion and of my flight, and I staggered and fell by the wayside.