wayward


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way·ward

 (wā′wərd)
adj.
1. Deviating from what is desired, expected, or required, especially in being disobedient or in gratifying one's own inclinations: "a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child" (George Orwell).
2. Difficult or impossible to manage, control, or keep in order: a wayward strand of hair.
3. Going somewhere not intended or desired: a wayward golf shot; a wayward courier.
4. Following no clear pattern; unpredictable: "events that were often thought to be wayward, capricious, and inexplicable" (Marq de Villiers).

[Middle English, short for awaiward, turned away, perverse : awai, away; see away + -ward, -ward.]

way′ward·ly adv.
way′ward·ness n.

wayward

(ˈweɪwəd)
adj
1. wanting to have one's own way regardless of the wishes or good of others
2. capricious, erratic, or unpredictable
[C14: changed from awayward turned or turning away]
ˈwaywardly adv
ˈwaywardness n

way•ward

(ˈweɪ wərd)

adj.
1. disregarding or rejecting what is right or proper; willful; disobedient.
2. prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse.
3. changing unpredictably; erratic: a wayward breeze.
[1350–1400; Middle English; aph. variant of awayward. See away, -ward]
way′ward•ly, adv.
way′ward•ness, n.
syn: See willful.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wayward - resistant to guidance or discipline; "Mary Mary quite contrary"; "an obstinate child with a violent temper"; "a perverse mood"; "wayward behavior"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"

wayward

wayward

adjective
Given to acting in opposition to others:
Translations
عاصٍ، صَعْب المِراس، مُتَمَرِّد
egenrådiguberegnelig
akaratos
einòykkur, òrjóskur, ódæll
neklusnus
ietiepīgskaprīzs
dik başlıisyankâr

wayward

[ˈweɪwəd] ADJ
1. (= wilful) [person] → rebelde; [behaviour] → díscolo, rebelde; [horse] → caprichoso, rebelde
she separated from her wayward husbandse separó del rebelde de su marido
2. (gen hum) (= unmanageable) [hair] → rebelde; [satellite, missile] → rebelde, incontrolable

wayward

[ˈweɪwərd] adjcapricieux/euse, entêté(e)

wayward

adj (= self-willed) child, horse, dispositioneigenwillig, eigensinnig; (= capricious) fancy, request, passionabwegig; (liter) stream, breezeunberechenbar, launisch (liter); their wayward sonihr ungeratener Sohn

wayward

[ˈweɪwəd] adj (self-willed) → ribelle, capriccioso/a

wayward

(ˈweiwəd) adjective
(of a child etc) self-willed and rebellious.
References in classic literature ?
Let him who calls me wild beast and basilisk, leave me alone as something noxious and evil; let him who calls me ungrateful, withhold his service; who calls me wayward, seek not my acquaintance; who calls me cruel, pursue me not; for this wild beast, this basilisk, this ungrateful, cruel, wayward being has no kind of desire to seek, serve, know, or follow them.
That odd sort of wayward mood I am speaking of, comes over a man only in some time of extreme tribulation; it comes in the very midst of his earnestness, so that what just before might have seemed to him a thing most momentous, now seems but a part of the general joke.
Changeable is she, and wayward; often have I seen her bite her lip, and pass the comb against the grain of her hair.
For, if you reflect a moment, you will see that, while it is easy to choose what virtues we would have our wife possess, it is all but impossible to imagine those faults we would desire in her, which I think most lovers would admit add piquancy to the loved one, that fascinating wayward imperfection which paradoxically makes her perfect.
Patient of toil, not to be disheartened by impediments and disappointments, fertile in expedients, and versed in every mode of humoring and conquering the wayward current, they would ply every exertion, sometimes in the boat, sometimes on shore, sometimes in the water, however cold; always alert, always in good humor; and, should they at any time flag or grow weary, one of their popular songs, chanted by a veteran oarsman, and responded to in chorus, acted as a never- failing restorative.
He was a strange wayward being, moody, fitful, and melancholy--at times almost morose.
The wayward boy soon spurned the shelter of his roof, and sought associates more congenial to his taste.
I remember her speaking of my smile, telling me it was my one adornment, and taking it from me, so to speak, for a moment to let me see how she looked in it; she delighted to make sport of me when she was in a wayward mood, and to show me all my ungainly tricks of voice and gesture, exaggerated and glorified in her entrancing self, like a star calling to the earth: "See, I will show you how you hobble round," and always there was a challenge to me in her eyes to stop her if I dared, and upon them, when she was most audacious, lay a sweet mist.
But he checked all such wayward fancies, and held himself rigidly down to his disquisition.
Young yet, barely thirty-six, eminently handsome, magnificently strong, almost bursting with a splendid virility, his free trail-stride, never learned on pavements, and his black eyes, hinting of great spaces and unwearied with the close perspective of the city dwellers, drew many a curious and wayward feminine glance.
I cannot say at what stage of my grief it first became associated with the reflection, that, in my wayward boyhood, I had thrown away the treasure of her love.
He took to Heathcliff strangely, believing all he said (for that matter, he said precious little, and generally the truth), and petting him up far above Cathy, who was too mischievous and wayward for a favourite.