wayward

(redirected from waywardly)
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way·ward

 (wā′wərd)
adj.
1. Deviating from what is desired, expected, or required, especially in being disobedient or in gratifying one's own inclinations: "a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child" (George Orwell).
2. Difficult or impossible to manage, control, or keep in order: a wayward strand of hair.
3. Going somewhere not intended or desired: a wayward golf shot; a wayward courier.
4. Following no clear pattern; unpredictable: "events that were often thought to be wayward, capricious, and inexplicable" (Marq de Villiers).

[Middle English, short for awaiward, turned away, perverse : awai, away; see away + -ward, -ward.]

way′ward·ly adv.
way′ward·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wayward

(ˈweɪwəd)
adj
1. wanting to have one's own way regardless of the wishes or good of others
2. capricious, erratic, or unpredictable
[C14: changed from awayward turned or turning away]
ˈwaywardly adv
ˈwaywardness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

way•ward

(ˈweɪ wərd)

adj.
1. disregarding or rejecting what is right or proper; willful; disobedient.
2. prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse.
3. changing unpredictably; erratic: a wayward breeze.
[1350–1400; Middle English; aph. variant of awayward. See away, -ward]
way′ward•ly, adv.
way′ward•ness, n.
syn: See willful.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wayward - resistant to guidance or discipline; "Mary Mary quite contrary"; "an obstinate child with a violent temper"; "a perverse mood"; "wayward behavior"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

wayward

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

wayward

adjective
Given to acting in opposition to others:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عاصٍ، صَعْب المِراس، مُتَمَرِّد
egenrådiguberegnelig
akaratos
einòykkur, òrjóskur, ódæll
neklusnus
ietiepīgskaprīzs
dik başlıisyankâr

wayward

[ˈweɪwəd] ADJ
1. (= wilful) [person] → rebelde; [behaviour] → díscolo, rebelde; [horse] → caprichoso, rebelde
she separated from her wayward husbandse separó del rebelde de su marido
2. (gen hum) (= unmanageable) [hair] → rebelde; [satellite, missile] → rebelde, incontrolable
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wayward

[ˈweɪwərd] adjcapricieux/euse, entêté(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wayward

adj (= self-willed) child, horse, dispositioneigenwillig, eigensinnig; (= capricious) fancy, request, passionabwegig; (liter) stream, breezeunberechenbar, launisch (liter); their wayward sonihr ungeratener Sohn
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

wayward

[ˈweɪwəd] adj (self-willed) → ribelle, capriccioso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

wayward

(ˈweiwəd) adjective
(of a child etc) self-willed and rebellious.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
I don't know about you, but I seem to get unsolicited sales calls at the most inappropriate times: while in the bath, while trying to park my car between two waywardly parked vehicles, while losing an argument with the wife or while trying to balance the monthly budget.
So she had stuck out her chin, waywardly truculent, chip off the old block, and had told them it was love.
Hinckley kicked waywardly into touch from Field's restart.
Law enforcement officers were said to have been summoned to Al Barsha area where two women were behaving waywardly outside a hotel in August.
Sambou put the gloss on the scoreline when he accepted Bass' gift - the goalkeeper passing it waywardly to the former Coventry man from a goal-kick.
Then Woakes, driving waywardly, was bowled through the gate.
Madson was involved in another fantastic move after he displaced an opponent and squared the ball for Reda Shanbah who shot waywardly just before halftime.
But the veteran striker, the fourth highest scorer in MLS history and playing in front of his home fans, blasted waywardly over the top.
They batted loosely, dropped catches, bowled waywardly and committed the cardinal sin of taking two "wickets" with no-balls.
The wonderful exhibition "Peter Saul: From Pop to Punk"--challenging, engrossing, troubling--which consisted of sixteen ambitious paintings and five equally ambitious drawings from the 1960s and '70s, was woefully mistitled: There was nothing waywardly adolescent about this show, nothing punk, as I understand the meaning of both word and style.