wayzgoose

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wayzgoose

(ˈweɪzˌɡuːs)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a works outing made annually by a printing house
[C18: from earlier waygoose, of unknown origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
But a good number of printers and presses embark on genuine wayzgooses each year, among them the Yale University Press, the Amalgamated Printers Association (U.
A wayzgoose is--and I quote--"An annual festivity held in summer by the employees of a printing establishment, consisting of a dinner and usually an excursion into the country (British).
With the enthusiastic support of nay family (husband: "I can't believe you're flying all the way to England for a picnic"), I begin to plan nay wayzgoose.
Geoff Heinricks, in his review of the modern wayzgoose of Grimsby, Canada, claims that in the past, the wayzgoose "was often a roaring, prankish and sotted day for those then at the cutting edge of communications, oh say in 1801," but alas, gives no clue as to how the extent of revelry is known.
Wayzgoose programs from Cambridge University Press in the U.
South African writer Roy Campbell (you know--author of The Flaming Terrapin) wrote a long satirical poem entitled The Wayzgoose in 1928, but on its first page he felt it necessary to define the term: "This phenomenon occurs annually in S.
My own wayzgoose was all that I had hoped for, thank you.
However, a wayzgoose is supposed to be an annual event.
I met Andrew Gilfillan, who had attended Cambridge University Press' last official wayzgoose in 1976.
In addition, their self-conscious engagement with the printing trade's rituals--the archaic chapel system, workers' wayzgoose festivals, and trade union parades--connected printers with their peers as well as their past, evoking history while manufacturing memory.
In many ways, the banner acknowledged the printing trade's world of self-conscious anachronism, comparable to those quaint customs of chapel, wayzgoose, and printers' argot, and emphasised continuity amidst change.