wean


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

wean

 (wēn)
tr.v. weaned, wean·ing, weans
1. To accustom (the young of a mammal) to take nourishment other than by suckling.
2. To detach from that to which one is strongly habituated or devoted: She weaned herself from cigarettes.
3. To accustom to something from an early age. Often used with on: "The northerners among the refugees ... were weaned on harsh weather and infertile soils and are known for their rigorous work ethic" (Lowell Weiss).

[Middle English wenen, from Old English wenian; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: In recent years weaned on has come to be widely used in the sense "raised on," as in Moviegoers weaned on the Star Trek TV series will doubtless find the film to their liking. A few critics have objected to this usage on the grounds that wean refers literally to a detachment from a source of nourishment. But the process of weaning involves a substitution of some other form of nourishment for mother's milk; thus it is sometimes said that a child is weaned onto or on sugar water. Hence a sentence like Paul was weaned on folk music may suggest metaphorically that Paul's exposure to folk music began from the time he stopped nursing, that is, from a very early age.

wean

(wiːn)
vb (tr)
1. (Physiology) to cause (a child or young mammal) to replace mother's milk by other nourishment
2. (Zoology) to cause (a child or young mammal) to replace mother's milk by other nourishment
3. (usually foll by from) to cause to desert former habits, pursuits, etc
[Old English wenian to accustom; related to German gewöhnen to get used to]
ˈweaning n

wean

(weɪn; wiːn)
n
dialect Scot and Northern English a child; infant
[a contraction of wee ane or perhaps a shortened form of weanling]

wean

(win)

v.t.
1. to cause (a child or young animal) to lose the need to suckle; accustom to food other than the mother's milk.
2. to withdraw (a person, the affections, etc.) from some object or practice deemed undesirable: to wean oneself from rich desserts.
3. wean on, to accustom to or familiarize with something from, or as if from, childhood: a brilliant student weaned on the classics.
[before 1000; Middle English wenen, Old English wenian to accustom, c. Old Saxon wennian, Old High German giwennen, Old Norse venja]
wean′ed•ness, n.

wean


Past participle: weaned
Gerund: weaning

Imperative
wean
wean
Present
I wean
you wean
he/she/it weans
we wean
you wean
they wean
Preterite
I weaned
you weaned
he/she/it weaned
we weaned
you weaned
they weaned
Present Continuous
I am weaning
you are weaning
he/she/it is weaning
we are weaning
you are weaning
they are weaning
Present Perfect
I have weaned
you have weaned
he/she/it has weaned
we have weaned
you have weaned
they have weaned
Past Continuous
I was weaning
you were weaning
he/she/it was weaning
we were weaning
you were weaning
they were weaning
Past Perfect
I had weaned
you had weaned
he/she/it had weaned
we had weaned
you had weaned
they had weaned
Future
I will wean
you will wean
he/she/it will wean
we will wean
you will wean
they will wean
Future Perfect
I will have weaned
you will have weaned
he/she/it will have weaned
we will have weaned
you will have weaned
they will have weaned
Future Continuous
I will be weaning
you will be weaning
he/she/it will be weaning
we will be weaning
you will be weaning
they will be weaning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been weaning
you have been weaning
he/she/it has been weaning
we have been weaning
you have been weaning
they have been weaning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been weaning
you will have been weaning
he/she/it will have been weaning
we will have been weaning
you will have been weaning
they will have been weaning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been weaning
you had been weaning
he/she/it had been weaning
we had been weaning
you had been weaning
they had been weaning
Conditional
I would wean
you would wean
he/she/it would wean
we would wean
you would wean
they would wean
Past Conditional
I would have weaned
you would have weaned
he/she/it would have weaned
we would have weaned
you would have weaned
they would have weaned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wean - gradually deprive (infants and young mammals) of mother's milkwean - gradually deprive (infants and young mammals) of mother's milk; "she weaned her baby when he was 3 months old and started him on powdered milk"; "The kitten was weaned and fed by its owner with a bottle"
deprive - keep from having, keeping, or obtaining
2.wean - detach the affections of
alienate, disaffect, estrange, alien - arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness; "She alienated her friends when she became fanatically religious"
Translations
يَفْطُم
vænne fra
venja af brjósti
やめさせる乳離れさせる
nujunkyti
atšķirt no krūtsatšķirt no mātes
odstaviť
memeden/sütten kesmek

wean

[wiːn] VT [+ child] → destetar
to wean sb (away) from sth (fig) → alejar a algn de algo

wean

[ˈwiːn] vt
[+ baby, young] → sevrer
to wean sb off sth → se sevrer de qch

wean

vt babyentwöhnen; to wean somebody from or off somebody/somethingjdn jdm/einer Sache entwöhnen (geh)

wean

[wiːn] vt (baby) → svezzare
to wean sb (away) from alcohol → far perdere a qn il vizio del bere

wean

(wiːn) verb
to cause (a child or young animal) to become used to food other than the mother's milk. The baby has been weaned (on to solid foods).

wean

n. destetar, quitar el pecho de la madre.

wean

vt destetar
References in classic literature ?
Lord love 'ee, neither court-paying, nor preaching, nor the seven thunders themselves, can wean a woman when
And disengaging a couple of chairs from the artistical lumber that usurped them, she bid us be seated, and resumed her place beside the easel - not facing it exactly, but now and then glancing at the picture upon it while she conversed, and giving it an occasional touch with her brush, as if she found it impossible to wean her attention entirely from her occupation to fix it upon her guests.
That man is to be pitied the most who cannot wean himself from gloomy reflections by actual work, or some practical pursuit.
She was Aileen's friend; and she was glad to see her rule hearts and wean the attention of men from smoking pot-pie and lemon meringue.
The first of those sorrows which are sent to wean us from the earth had visited her, and its dimming influence quenched her dearest smiles.
"I never had any one, horse or man, that was kind to me, or that I cared to please, for in the first place I was taken from my mother as soon as I was weaned, and put with a lot of other young colts; none of them cared for me, and I cared for none of them.
She did not rebuke Jo with saintly speeches, only loved her better for her passionate affection, and clung more closely to the dear human love, from which our Father never means us to be weaned, but through which He draws us closer to Himself.
The propriety of these distinctions is explained by the nature of the senatorial trust, which, requiring greater extent of information and tability of character, requires at the same time that the senator should have reached a period of life most likely to supply these advantages; and which, participating immediately in transactions with foreign nations, ought to be exercised by none who are not thoroughly weaned from the prepossessions and habits incident to foreign birth and education.
Hetty blushed a deep rose-colour when Captain Donnithorne entered the dairy and spoke to her; but it was not at all a distressed blush, for it was inwreathed with smiles and dimples, and with sparkles from under long, curled, dark eyelashes; and while her aunt was discoursing to him about the limited amount of milk that was to be spared for butter and cheese so long as the calves were not all weaned, and a large quantity but inferior quality of milk yielded by the shorthorn, which had been bought on experiment, together with other matters which must be interesting to a young gentleman who would one day be a landlord, Hetty tossed and patted her pound of butter with quite a self-possessed, coquettish air, slyly conscious that no turn of her head was lost.
On the other hand, their six or eight years of book education had weaned them away from the occupation of their mothers.
It weaned me of all further desire to rail at Mary, and I felt an uncommon drawing to her.
A puppy, a little puppy scarcely weaned. For two cents I'd give you what-for myself.