wearer


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wear

 (wâr)
v. wore (wôr), worn (wôrn), wear·ing, wears
v.tr.
1. To carry or have on one's person as covering, adornment, or protection: wearing a jacket; must wear a seat belt.
2. To carry or have habitually on one's person, especially as an aid: wears glasses.
3. To display in one's appearance: always wears a smile.
4. To bear, carry, or maintain in a particular manner: wears her hair long.
5. To fly or display (colors). Used of a ship, jockey, or knight.
6. To damage, diminish, erode, or consume by long or hard use, attrition, or exposure. Often used with away, down, or off: rocks worn away by the sea; shoes worn down at the heels.
7. To produce by constant use, attrition, or exposure: eventually wore hollows in the stone steps.
8. To bring to a specified condition by long use or attrition: wore the clothes to rags; pebbles worn smooth.
9. To fatigue, weary, or exhaust: Your incessant criticism has worn my patience.
10. Nautical To make (a sailing ship) come about with the wind aft.
v.intr.
1.
a. To last under continual or hard use: a fabric that will wear.
b. To last through the passage of time: a friendship that wears well.
2. To break down or diminish through use or attrition: The rear tires began to wear.
3. To pass gradually or tediously: The hours wore on.
4. Nautical To come about with stern to windward.
n.
1. The act of wearing or the state of being worn; use: This shirt is ideal for wear in sultry climates.
2. Clothing, especially of a particular kind or for a particular use. Often used in combination: rainwear; footwear.
3. Damage resulting from use or age: The rug shows plenty of wear.
4. The ability to withstand impairment from use or attrition: The engine has plenty of wear left.
Phrasal Verbs:
wear down
To break down or exhaust by relentless pressure or resistance: The child's pleading finally wore her parents down.
wear off
To diminish gradually in effect: The drug wore off.
wear out
1. To make or become unusable through long or heavy use: wore out a pair of hockey skates; a vacuum that finally wore out.
2. To exhaust; tire: Raking the leaves wore me out.
3. To use up or consume gradually: His complaining finally wore out my patience.
Idioms:
wear the pants/trousers Informal
To exercise controlling authority in a household.
wear thin
1. To be weakened or eroded gradually: Her patience is wearing thin.
2. To become less convincing, acceptable, or popular, as through repeated use: excuses that are wearing thin.

[Middle English weren, from Old English werian; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

wear′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wearer - a person who wears or carries or displays something as a body covering or accessory; "the wearer of the crown"
user - a person who makes use of a thing; someone who uses or employs something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
لابِس، مُرْتَدٍ
dender har det på
viselõ
sá sem klæîist tiltekinni flík
nositeľ
giyentakan

wearer

[ˈwɛərəʳ] N contact lens/denture wearerspersonas que usan lentillas/dentadura postiza
spectacle wearerspersonas que llevan gafas
this device can improve the wearer's hearing considerablyeste dispositivo puede mejorar considerablemente la audición del usuario
wearers of bowler hatslos que llevan sombrero de hongo
a mask grants the wearer anonymityuna máscara da anonimato a quien la lleva
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wearer

[ˈwɛərər] nporteur/euse m/f
contact lens wearers → les porteurs de lentilles de contact
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wearer

nTräger(in) m(f); wearer of spectacles, spectacle wearerBrillenträger(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

wearer

[ˈwɛərəʳ] n the wearers of the blue coatsquelli che portano il cappotto blu
will the wearer of the red jacket come forward? → si prega la persona che indossa la giacca rossa di venire avanti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

wear

(weə) past tense wore (woː) ; past participle worn (woːn) verb
1. to be dressed in or carry on (a part of) the body. She wore a white dress; Does she usually wear spectacles?
2. to arrange (one's hair) in a particular way. She wears her hair in a pony-tail.
3. to have or show (a particular expression). She wore an angry expression.
4. to (cause to) become thinner etc because of use, rubbing etc. This carpet has worn in several places; This sweater is wearing thin at the elbows.
5. to make (a bare patch, a hole etc) by rubbing, use etc. I've worn a hole in the elbow of my jacket.
6. to stand up to use. This material doesn't wear very well.
noun
1. use as clothes etc. I use this suit for everyday wear; Those shoes won't stand much wear.
2. articles for use as clothes. casual wear; sportswear; leisure wear.
3. (sometimes wear and tear) damage due to use. The hall carpet is showing signs of wear.
4. ability to withstand use. There's plenty of wear left in it yet.
ˈwearable adjective
(negative unwearable) fit to be worn. My only wearable coat is at the cleaners.
ˈwearer noun
a dress that makes the wearer feel elegant.
ˈwearing adjective
exhausting. I've had rather a wearing day.
worn (woːn) adjective
damaged as a result of use. a badly-worn carpet.
wear away
to make or become damaged, thinner, smoother etc through use, rubbing etc. The steps have (been) worn away in places.
wear off
to become less. The pain is wearing off.
wear out
to (cause to) become unfit for further use. My socks have worn out; I've worn out my socks.
worn out
1. so damaged by use as to be unfit for further use. These shoes are worn out; a worn-out sweater.
2. very tired. His wife is worn out after looking after the children.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
When I say petticoat, I use the word in its literal sense, not colloquially as a metaphor for its usual wearer, meaning thereby a dainty feminine undergarment seen only by men on rainy days, and one might add washing-days.
A veil of silk, interwoven with gold, was attached to the upper part of it, which could be, at the wearer's pleasure, either drawn over the face and bosom after the Spanish fashion, or disposed as a sort of drapery round the shoulders.
They had a sinister expression, under an old cocked-hat like a three-cornered spittoon, and over a great muffler for the chin and throat, which descended nearly to the wearer's knees.
So saying he set out and travelled till he came to a hill, where three giants were sharing their father's goods; and as they saw him pass they cried out and said, 'Little men have sharp wits; he shall part the goods between us.' Now there was a sword that cut off an enemy's head whenever the wearer gave the words, 'Heads off!'; a cloak that made the owner invisible, or gave him any form he pleased; and a pair of boots that carried the wearer wherever he wished.
Yet is it bright with many a gem; i, the wearer, see not its far flashings; but darkly feel that i wear that, that dazzlingly confounds.
The white, down-trimmed cloak, with certain imposing ornaments on the hood, was assumed with becoming gravity and draped with much advancing and retreating before the glass, as its wearer practised the true Boston gait, elbows back, shoulders forward, a bend and a slide, occasionally varied by a slight skip.
Every day our garments become more assimilated to ourselves, receiving the impress of the wearer's character, until we hesitate to lay them aside without such delay and medical appliances and some such solemnity even as our bodies.
Sir Kay told how he had en- countered me in a far land of barbarians, who all wore the same ridiculous garb that I did -- a garb that was a work of enchantment, and intended to make the wearer secure from hurt by human hands.
"Why, the wearer must have shone like a golden image!" said Clara.
But the point which drew all eyes, and, as it were, transfigured the wearer -- so that both men and women who had been familiarly acquainted with Hester Prynne were now impressed as if they beheld her for the first time -- was that SCARLET LETTER, so fantastically embroidered and illuminated upon her bosom.
So the uniform remained at Portsmouth, and Edmund conjectured that before Fanny had any chance of seeing it, all its own freshness and all the freshness of its wearer's feelings must be worn away.
"It is Val Dor, Princess," the warrior replied, "and here to die for you if need be, as is every wearer of the Black upon this field of jetan today.