weary

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wea·ry

 (wîr′ē)
adj. wea·ri·er, wea·ri·est
1. Physically or mentally tired.
2. Expressive of or prompted by tiredness: a weary smile.
3. Having one's interest, forbearance, or indulgence worn out: weary of delays.
4. Causing fatigue; tiresome: a weary wait.
tr. & intr.v. wea·ried, wea·ry·ing, wea·ries
To make or become weary. See Synonyms at tire1.

[Middle English weri, from Old English wērig.]

wea′ri·ly adv.
wea′ri·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

weary

(ˈwɪərɪ)
adj, -rier or -riest
1. tired or exhausted
2. causing fatigue or exhaustion
3. caused by or suggestive of weariness: a weary laugh.
4. (postpositive; often foll by of or with) discontented or bored, esp by the long continuance of something
vb, -ries, -rying or -ried
5. to make or become weary
6. to make or become discontented or impatient, esp by the long continuance of something
[Old English wērig; related to Old Saxon wōrig, Old High German wuorag drunk, Greek hōrakian to faint]
ˈwearily adv
ˈweariness n
ˈwearying adj
ˈwearyingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wea•ry

(ˈwɪər i)

adj. -ri•er, -ri•est, adj.
1. physically or mentally exhausted; fatigued; tired.
2. characterized by or causing fatigue: a weary journey.
3. impatient or dissatisfied with something (often fol. by of): weary of excuses.
4. characterized by or causing impatience or dissatisfaction; tedious; irksome: a weary wait.
v.t., v.i.
5. to make or become weary; fatigue or tire.
6. to make or grow impatient or dissatisfied with something (often fol. by of): He wearied of living in hotel rooms.
[before 900; Middle English wery, Old English wērig, c. Old Saxon sīthwōrig trip-weary, Old High German wuarag drunk; akin to Old English wōrian to crumble, totter]
wea′ri•ly, adv.
wea′ri•ness, n.
wea′ry•ing•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

weary


Past participle: wearied
Gerund: wearying

Imperative
weary
weary
Present
I weary
you weary
he/she/it wearies
we weary
you weary
they weary
Preterite
I wearied
you wearied
he/she/it wearied
we wearied
you wearied
they wearied
Present Continuous
I am wearying
you are wearying
he/she/it is wearying
we are wearying
you are wearying
they are wearying
Present Perfect
I have wearied
you have wearied
he/she/it has wearied
we have wearied
you have wearied
they have wearied
Past Continuous
I was wearying
you were wearying
he/she/it was wearying
we were wearying
you were wearying
they were wearying
Past Perfect
I had wearied
you had wearied
he/she/it had wearied
we had wearied
you had wearied
they had wearied
Future
I will weary
you will weary
he/she/it will weary
we will weary
you will weary
they will weary
Future Perfect
I will have wearied
you will have wearied
he/she/it will have wearied
we will have wearied
you will have wearied
they will have wearied
Future Continuous
I will be wearying
you will be wearying
he/she/it will be wearying
we will be wearying
you will be wearying
they will be wearying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wearying
you have been wearying
he/she/it has been wearying
we have been wearying
you have been wearying
they have been wearying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wearying
you will have been wearying
he/she/it will have been wearying
we will have been wearying
you will have been wearying
they will have been wearying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wearying
you had been wearying
he/she/it had been wearying
we had been wearying
you had been wearying
they had been wearying
Conditional
I would weary
you would weary
he/she/it would weary
we would weary
you would weary
they would weary
Past Conditional
I would have wearied
you would have wearied
he/she/it would have wearied
we would have wearied
you would have wearied
they would have wearied
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.weary - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stressweary - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike"
indispose - cause to feel unwell; "She was indisposed"
exhaust, tucker, tucker out, wash up, beat - wear out completely; "This kind of work exhausts me"; "I'm beat"; "He was all washed up after the exam"
overfatigue, overtire, overweary - tire excessively
2.weary - lose interest or become bored with something or somebody; "I'm so tired of your mother and her complaints about my food"
degenerate, deteriorate, devolve, drop - grow worse; "Her condition deteriorated"; "Conditions in the slums degenerated"; "The discussion devolved into a shouting match"
poop out, conk out, peter out, run down, run out - use up all one's strength and energy and stop working; "At the end of the march, I pooped out"
retire, withdraw - lose interest; "he retired from life when his wife died"
Adj.1.weary - physically and mentally fatiguedweary - physically and mentally fatigued; "`aweary' is archaic"
tired - depleted of strength or energy; "tired mothers with crying babies"; "too tired to eat"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

weary

adjective
1. tired, exhausted, drained, worn out, spent, done in (informal), flagging, all in (slang), fatigued, wearied, sleepy, fagged (informal), whacked (Brit. informal), jaded, drooping, knackered (slang), drowsy, clapped out (Austral. & N.Z. informal), enervated, ready to drop, dog-tired (informal), zonked (slang), dead beat (informal), asleep or dead on your feet (informal) She sank to the ground, too weary to walk another step.
tired fresh, stimulated, lively, refreshed, energetic, invigorated, full of beans (informal), full of get-up-and-go (informal)
2. fed up, bored, sick (informal), discontented, impatient, indifferent, jaded, sick and tired (informal), browned-off (informal) He was growing weary of his wife's constant complaints.
fed up patient, excited, amused, forbearing
3. tiring, taxing, wearing, arduous, tiresome, laborious, irksome, wearisome, enervative a long, weary journey in search of food and water
tiring exciting, refreshing, invigorating
verb
1. grow tired, tire, sicken, have had enough, become bored He had wearied of teaching in state universities.
2. bore, annoy, plague, sicken, jade, exasperate, vex, irk, try the patience of, make discontented Her nagging and criticism wearied him so much that he left her.
bore interest, excite, amuse
3. tire, tax, burden, drain, fatigue, fag (informal), sap, wear out, debilitate, take it out of (informal), tire out, enervate Her pregnancy wearied her to the point of exhaustion.
tire stimulate, revive, refresh, enliven, invigorate
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

weary

adjective
1. Extremely tired:
Informal: beat, bushed, tuckered (out).
Slang: done in, fagged (out), pooped (out).
Idioms: all in, ready to drop.
2. Out of patience with:
verb
1. To diminish the strength and energy of:
2. To fatigue with dullness or tedium:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَعْبان، ضَجِر، مُرْهَقيُتْعِب، يَتْعَب
blive trættrættrætte
väsynyt
kifárad
òreytaòreyttur, òreytulegur
nuvargęsnuvargtisu nuovargiuvarginamai
nogurdinātnogurisnogurt
utrujen
trötttröttatrötta uttröttna
bık makbıkmışusanmışyor makyorgun

weary

[ˈwɪərɪ]
A. ADJ (wearier (compar) (weariest (superl)))
1. [person] → cansado; [sigh, smile, voice] → de cansancio
to be weary of sth/sbestar cansado or harto de algo/algn
to be weary of doing sthestar cansado or harto de hacer algo
to grow weary [person] → cansarse
he had grown weary of travellingse había cansado de viajar
2. (liter) (= tiring) [wait, day] → pesado
five weary hourscinco agotadoras horas
B. VT (frm) → cansar, agotar
C. VI (frm) to weary of sth/sbcansarse or hartarse de algo/algn
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

weary

[ˈwɪəri]
adj
(= tired) → exténué(e)
(= dispirited) → las(lasse)
to be weary of sb/sth → être las de qn/qch(lasse)
vtlasser
vi
to weary of sth → se lasser de qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

weary

adj (+er)
(= tired, dispirited)müde; (= fed up)lustlos; smile, groanmatt; to feel or be wearymüde sein; to be/grow weary of somethingetw leid sein/werden, einer Sache (gen)überdrüssig or müde sein/werden (geh)
(= tiring) wait, routine etcermüdend; for three weary hoursdrei endlose Stunden (lang); five weary milesfünf lange or beschwerliche Meilen
vtermüden
vi to weary of somethingeiner Sache (gen)müde or überdrüssig werden (geh); she wearied of being alonesie wurde es leid or müde (geh)or überdrüssig (geh), → allein zu sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

weary

[ˈwɪərɪ]
1. adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (tired) → stanco/a, affaticato/a; (dispirited) → stanco/a, abbattuto/a; (tiring, wait, day) → estenuante
to be weary of sb/sth → essere stanco/a di qn/qc
five weary miles → cinque lunghe miglia
2. vtstancare
3. vi to weary of sb/sthstancarsi di qn/qc
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

weary

(ˈwiəri) adjective
tired; with strength or patience exhausted. a weary sigh; He looks weary; I am weary of his jokes.
verb
to (cause to) become tired. The patient wearies easily; Don't weary the patient.
ˈwearily adverb
ˈweariness noun
ˈwearisome adjective
causing weariness. a wearisome journey.
ˈwearisomely adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

weary

a. cansado-a, fatigado-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
From that hour of evil omen until the present, it may be,--though we know not the secret of his heart,--but it may be that no wearier and sadder man had ever sunk into the chair than this same Judge Pyncheon, whom we have just beheld so immitigably hard and resolute.
But bid thy companion eat and drink also, he is wearier than thou." Zarathustra answered: "My companion is dead; I shall hardly be able to persuade him to eat." "That doth not concern me," said the old man sullenly; "he that knocketh at my door must take what I offer him.
But the teeth he set at the town, and the hand he shook at the town, brought the town no nearer; and the man was yet hungrier, and thirstier, and wearier, when his feet were on its jagged pavement, and he stood looking about him.
But his voice had grown fainter and wearier with every answer, and now there was no answer at all.
Outside, I feel M growing wearier from waiting, and from want of an explanation.
Mohun Bagan will come out all guns blazing to overcome the setback of the derby loss and Gokulam, surely the wearier of the two sides after being a month and a half on the road, if not more emotionally drained, will find them a handful.
For as we prepare to enter a third year of talking/ fighting/boring each other on Brexit, the national life of our country trudges on, getting wearier and weaker, but not earning a second glance from the planner politicians.
In a nation that seems to grow wearier of its political parties with each passing day, Lucas Cunningham is a champion of public service; he hopes to affect change within the current two-party system, and is already doing all he can to plot his course to the White House.
De Villiers was only 30 at the time, but that night in Auckland he looked older and wearier. It is only now that he has called time on his international career, a year before the start of another World Cup, that we can begin to fathom just what was lost at Eden Park.
Less than an hour later a wearier, skinter mother stashed several bulging carrier bags beneath the narrow table and summoned an urgent cold beer.
As time clicked by, and the class discovered more and more things from deep within the book they were ill-prepared for, everyone began to grow more anxious and wearier.
As I mentioned earlier, the concept of the book had always been something I dreamed of doing, but, two years ago, we were met with hesitation when women were wearier of having their faces published.