weaver


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

weav·er

 (wē′vər)
n.
1. One that weaves: a weaver of fine rugs.
2. A weaverbird.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

weaver

(ˈwiːvə)
n
1. (Textiles) a person who weaves, esp as a means of livelihood
2. (Animals) short for weaverbird
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

weav•er

(ˈwi vər)

n.
1. a person who weaves.
2. a person whose occupation is weaving.
3. Also called weav′er•bird` (-ˌbɜrd) any of numerous finchlike African and Asian birds of the family Ploceidae, noted for their elaborately woven nests and colonial habits.
[1325–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weaver - a craftsman who weaves clothweaver - a craftsman who weaves cloth  
artisan, journeyman, artificer, craftsman - a skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft
2.weaver - finch-like African and Asian colonial birds noted for their elaborately woven nestsweaver - finch-like African and Asian colonial birds noted for their elaborately woven nests
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
baya, Ploceus philippinus - common Indian weaverbird
whidah, whydah, widow bird - mostly black African weaverbird
Java finch, Java sparrow, Padda oryzivora, ricebird - small finch-like Indonesian weaverbird that frequents rice fields
amadavat, avadavat - red Asian weaverbirds often kept as cage birds
grass finch, grassfinch - usually brightly-colored Australian weaverbirds; often kept as cage birds
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ناسِج، حائِك
væver
takács
vefari
tkáč
tkalec

weaver

[ˈwiːvəʳ] Ntejedor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

weaver

[ˈwiːvər] ntisserand(e) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

weaver

nWeber(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

weaver

[ˈwiːvəʳ] ntessitore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

weave

(wiːv) past tense wove (wouv) : past participle woven (ˈwouvən) verb
1. to make by crossing strands in a pattern. to weave cloth.
2. to tell (an interesting story).
3. (past tense, past participle weaved) to move backwards and forwards or from side to side. The cyclist weaved in and out of the traffic.
ˈweaver noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
the wood was green as mosses of the icy Glen; the trees stood high and haughty, feeling their living sap; the industrious earth beneath was as a weaver's loom, with a gorgeous carpet on it, whereof the ground-vine tendrils formed the warp and woof, and the living flowers the figures.
A thing of stone beside Lake Kouen-ming Has for a thousand autumns borne the name Of the Celestial Weaver. Like that star She shines above the waters, wondering At her pale loveliness.
Their psychology is bovine, their outlook crude and rare; They abandon vital matters to be tickled with a straw; But the straw that they were tickled with--the chaff that they were fed with-- They convert into a weaver's beam to break their foeman's head with.
This view of Marner's personality was not without another ground than his pale face and unexampled eyes; for Jem Rodney, the mole-catcher, averred that one evening as he was returning homeward, he saw Silas Marner leaning against a stile with a heavy bag on his back, instead of resting the bag on the stile as a man in his senses would have done; and that, on coming up to him, he saw that Marner's eyes were set like a dead man's, and he spoke to him, and shook him, and his limbs were stiff, and his hands clutched the bag as if they'd been made of iron; but just as he had made up his mind that the weaver was dead, he came all right again, like, as you might say, in the winking of an eye, and said "Good-night", and walked off.
Such colloquies have occupied many a pair of pale-faced weavers, whose unnurtured souls have been like young winged things, fluttering forsaken in the twilight.
Neither will the builder make his tools--and he too needs many; and in like manner the weaver and shoemaker.
Yet even if we add neatherds, shepherds, and other herdsmen, in order that our husbandmen may have oxen to plough with, and builders as well as husbandmen may have draught cattle, and curriers and weavers fleeces and hides,--still our State will not be very large.
But the greatest curiosity, upon which the fate of the island depends, is a loadstone of a prodigious size, in shape resembling a weaver's shuttle.
The king was willing, but the Board, who were all well-born folk, implored the king to spare them the indignity of examining the weaver's son.
The cradle-rockers had done hard duty for so many years, under the weight of so many children, on that flagstone floor, that they were worn nearly flat, in consequence of which a huge jerk accompanied each swing of the cot, flinging the baby from side to side like a weaver's shuttle, as Mrs Durbeyfield, excited by her song, trod the rocker with all the spring that was left in her after a long day's seething in the suds.
One day, two rogues, calling themselves weavers, made their appearance.
One day two impostors arrived who gave themselves out as weavers, and said that they knew how to manufacture the most beautiful cloth imaginable.