web member


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web member

n.
One of the structural elements connecting the top and bottom flanges of a lattice girder or the outside members of a truss.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Based on the working mechanism analysis, the area ratio of web member to chord and the stiffness ratio of coupling beam to shear wall are proposed for the evaluation of seismic performances of steel truss CBs.
Caption: FIGURE 17: Relationship between stress and strain of the web member. (a) 1 m wall depth before the member buckling ([[lambda].sub.E] = 7.4).
In the process when the load is increased to 2000 kN, cracks are seen on concrete for the first time, mainly on the enlarged cross section, between two web members and at the sectional corner of the compressive web member.
The trusses come in various shapes and sizes, and often include long, slender compression web members. When a compression web member exceeds the allowable stress for a specific grade and size of the member, lateral bracing is introduced to reduce the effective buckling length of the web.
Waltz [17] studied the design requirements for bracing a 2 by 4 compression web member at one brace support point at the center of the web.
A pultruded HFRP tube and GFRP tube were used for the lower chord members and diagonal web members, respectively.
It acts as a vertical truss, with the columns as chords and the braces and girders as web members. The most efficient and conventional type of bracing, using full diagonals, is also the most obstructive to architectural plan.
Even where distance would seem to preclude it, WEB members still relied on some use of relational mechanisms.
The major failure occurred at web members of trusses between loading points and supports, i.e., within the range of shear span.
Web members work together on many schemes, linked by a common theme - power projects, for example.
The conventional three categories of basal, intermediate, and top species were used to classify web members. Basal "species" included decomposing organic material and its associated microorganisms which we defined as detritus, microinorganic material and associated microorganisms (MIP), and vascular plant material.