weeds


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

weed 1

 (wēd)
n.
1. A plant considered undesirable, unattractive, or troublesome, especially one that grows where it is not wanted and often grows or spreads fast or takes the place of desired plants.
2. An aquatic plant or alga, especially seaweed.
3. Something considered useless, detrimental, or worthless.
4. Slang
a. Tobacco.
b. A cigarette.
c. Marijuana.
v. weed·ed, weed·ing, weeds
v.tr.
1. To clear of weeds: weeded the flowerbeds.
2. To remove (weeds). Often used with out: weed out dandelions.
3. To eliminate as unsuitable or unwanted. Often used with out: weed out unqualified applicants.
v.intr.
To remove weeds.

[Middle English, from Old English wēod, herb, grass, weed.]

weed 2

 (wēd)
n.
1. A token of mourning, as a black band worn on a man's hat or sleeve.
2. weeds The black mourning clothes of a widow.
3. often weeds Archaic An article of clothing; a garment.

[Middle English wede, garment, from Old English wǣd.]

weeds

(wiːdz)
pl n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: widow's weeds a widow's black mourning clothes
2. (Clothing & Fashion) obsolete any clothing
[pl of weed2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weeds - a black garment (dress) worn by a widow as a sign of mourningweeds - a black garment (dress) worn by a widow as a sign of mourning
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations

weeds

pl (= mourning clothes)Trauerkleider pl
References in classic literature ?
He felt that his blighted affections were quite dead now, and though he should never cease to be a faithful mourner, there was no occasion to wear his weeds ostentatiously.
Across a long field that had been seeded for clover but that had produced only a dense crop of yellow mustard weeds, he could see the public highway along which went a wagon filled with berry pickers returning from the fields.
We were talking about what it is like to spend one's childhood in little towns like these, buried in wheat and corn, under stimulating extremes of climate: burning summers when the world lies green and billowy beneath a brilliant sky, when one is fairly stifled in vegetation, in the color and smell of strong weeds and heavy harvests; blustery winters with little snow, when the whole country is stripped bare and gray as sheet-iron.
There were strange, rare odors abroad-- a tangle of the sea smell and of weeds and damp, new-plowed earth, mingled with the heavy perfume of a field of white blossoms somewhere near.
It would be an omission, trifling, indeed, but unpardonable, were we to forget the green moss that had long since gathered over the projections of the windows, and on the slopes of the roof nor must we fail to direct the reader's eye to a crop, not of weeds, but flower-shrubs, which were growing aloft in the air, not a great way from the chimney, in the nook between two of the gables.
Here and there, perchance, the walls may remain almost complete; but elsewhere may be only a shapeless mound, cumbrous with its very strength, and overgrown, through long years of peace and neglect, with grass and alien weeds.
As we have seen, God came upon him in the whale, and swallowed him down to living gulfs of doom, and with swift slantings tore him along"into the midst of the seas," where the eddying depths sucked him ten thousand fathoms down, and"the weeds were wrapped about his head," and all the watery world of woe bowled over him.
These bare places were grown up with dingy, yellow weeds, hiding innumerable tomato cans; innumerable children played upon them, chasing one another here and there, screaming and fighting.
Clare was a good deal affected at the sight of it; the little book had been rolled in a long strip of black crape, torn from the funeral weeds.
They raised their pile of dry brush and damp weeds higher and higher, and when they saw the thick cloud begin to roll up and smother the tree, they broke out in a storm of joy-clamors.
These piteous wrecks that are my comrades here say we have reached the bottom of the scale, the final humiliation; they say that when a horse is no longer worth the weeds and discarded rubbish they feed to him, they sell him to the bull-ring for a glass of brandy, to make sport for the people and perish for their pleasure.
At the end of half an hour, he fetches up within six inches of the place he started from and lays his burden down; meantime he as been over all the ground for two yards around, and climbed all the weeds and pebbles he came across.