weeds


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weed 1

 (wēd)
n.
1. A plant considered undesirable, unattractive, or troublesome, especially one that grows where it is not wanted and often grows or spreads fast or takes the place of desired plants.
2. An aquatic plant or alga, especially seaweed.
3. Something considered useless, detrimental, or worthless.
4. Slang
a. Tobacco.
b. A cigarette.
c. Marijuana.
v. weed·ed, weed·ing, weeds
v.tr.
1. To clear of weeds: weeded the flowerbeds.
2. To remove (weeds). Often used with out: weed out dandelions.
3. To eliminate as unsuitable or unwanted. Often used with out: weed out unqualified applicants.
v.intr.
To remove weeds.

[Middle English, from Old English wēod, herb, grass, weed.]

weed 2

 (wēd)
n.
1. A token of mourning, as a black band worn on a man's hat or sleeve.
2. weeds The black mourning clothes of a widow.
3. often weeds Archaic An article of clothing; a garment.

[Middle English wede, garment, from Old English wǣd.]

weeds

(wiːdz)
pl n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: widow's weeds a widow's black mourning clothes
2. (Clothing & Fashion) obsolete any clothing
[pl of weed2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weeds - a black garment (dress) worn by a widow as a sign of mourningweeds - a black garment (dress) worn by a widow as a sign of mourning
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations

weeds

pl (= mourning clothes)Trauerkleider pl
References in classic literature ?
So when the Old Man was dead each of the youths put a weed upon his hat and wore it until he was himself old, when, seeing that neither would give in, they agreed that the younger should leave off his weeds and the elder give him half of the estate.
A FARMER being about to die, and knowing that during his illness his Sons had permitted the vineyard to become overgrown with weeds while they improved the shining hour by gambling with the doctor, said to them:
Before yet any woodchuck or squirrel had run across the road, or the sun had got above the shrub oaks, while all the dew was on, though the farmers warned me against it -- I would advise you to do all your work if possible while the dew is on -- I began to level the ranks of haughty weeds in my bean-field and throw dust upon their heads.
There was a feeling of freshness and vigour in the very streets; and when I got free of the town, when my foot was on the sands and my face towards the broad, bright bay, no language can describe the effect of the deep, clear azure of the sky and ocean, the bright morning sunshine on the semicircular barrier of craggy cliffs surmounted by green swelling hills, and on the smooth, wide sands, and the low rocks out at sea--looking, with their clothing of weeds and moss, like little grass-grown islands--and above all, on the brilliant, sparkling waves.
The evil of these departed years would naturally have sprung up again, in such rank weeds (symbolic of the transmitted vices of society) as are always prone to root themselves about human dwellings.
She searched about until she found a rather sharp piece of wood and knelt down and dug and weeded out the weeds and grass until she made nice little clear places around them.
The outskirt of the garden in which Tess found herself had been left uncultivated for some years, and was now damp and rank with juicy grass which sent up mists of pollen at a touch; and with tall blooming weeds emitting offensive smells--weeds whose red and yellow and purple hues formed a polychrome as dazzling as that of cultivated flowers.
These piteous wrecks that are my comrades here say we have reached the bottom of the scale, the final humiliation; they say that when a horse is no longer worth the weeds and discarded rubbish they feed to him, they sell him to the bull-ring for a glass of brandy, to make sport for the people and perish for their pleasure.
There reigns a heavy silence; gaunt weeds through windows pry, And down the streets of Liang old echoes, wailing, die.
He ordered them to continue hoeing weeds in a distant and out-of-the-way corner, and went on with the pursuit of Tudor.
On the fourteenth day I went into the kitchen, and I was surprised to find that the fronds of the red weed had grown right across the hole in the wall, turning the half-light of the place into a crimson-coloured obscurity.
I caught a glimpse of pieces of stone covered with millions of zoophytes and masses of sea weed.