weephole

weephole

(ˈwiːpˌhəʊl)
n
a small drain hole in a wall
References in periodicals archive ?
Several inspections in the l990s uncovered sand erosion through at least one weephole and significant flows running through the weepholes in the downstream retaining wall.
The findings led to several conclusions: significant groundwater flows were occurring around the existing cutoff wall and were merging with the natural groundwater movement from the upland area; a large area of loose, potentially unstable soil existed behind the downstream retaining wall; vertical seepage via connection with voids in the limestone aquifer was not believed to be a significant component of groundwater flows; and the downstream retaining wall's flexural capacity was unacceptable for groundwater elevations at or above the upper level of weepholes, but was acceptable for groundwater elevations at or below the lower level of weepholes.
The existing drainage weepholes in the wall will also be infilled with concrete and faced with existing stone where possible.
The rainscreen approach has been advocated in Canada since the 1960s (Garden 1963) and typically procure a second line of defense including a vertical drainage plane behind the cladding, flashing, and weepholes to ensure that any rainwater leaking through the outer veneer can effectively be drained back to the outside.
Weepholes can also be installed by drilling a half-inch diameter hole through the base course every 6 to 8 feet.
Pre-punched weepholes along the bottom butt edge of the siding allow condensation to drain out.
Carbary, a technical service specialist at Dow Corning, stresses the need for professionals well-versed in materials and methods, citing cases in which overzealous window washers caulked over weepholes, and used highly durable silicone sealant inappropriately on painted masonry tilt-up construction.
Windows, doors, roof penetrations, cracks, weepholes, and other junctures interrupt the surface.
When setting the base course of the veneer, insert 1/4 inch hollow tubes through the bottom bed of mortar every 16 inches to serve as weepholes for moisture that may pass through the veneer.
thick liners incorporating welded-wire fabric as reinforcement in many cases, in addition to weepholes in sloped walls and varying types of joints.