weird sisters


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weird sisters

pl n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) another name for Fates
2. (Norse Myth & Legend) Norse myth the Norns. See Norn1
References in classic literature ?
I dared not wait to see him return, for I feared to see those weird sisters. I came back to the library, and read there till I fell asleep.
He claims that the Weird Sisters cannot be believed anymore, and two lines later he says to Macduff: "I'll not fight with thee." These two statements of Macbeth are in unmistakable contradiction with each-other.
It also features Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker in a group called the Weird Sisters, who provide the music for the pupils to strut their stuff to.
The notorious Weird Sisters are anything but gnarled and hobbled witches but more resembled Atomic Kittens.
YSTRADGYNLAIS: The Welfare (01639 843163), The Weird Sisters Get Around - a new wild woman's double act has arrived, 7.30pm.
These weird sisters, phallic in inspiration, ambiguously maleficent in pose and identity, seem to have been inspired by the vengeful Eumenides who, in Aeschylus' drama, pursued Orestes after Athens lost the Peloponnesian war.
Briggs's description in Pale Hecate's Team (London, 1962), 78:'On the whole the witches, who are never so named, seem to have the ordinary witch characteristics, but something of the weird sisters clings to them; and they are even more like the supernatural hags of Scandinavian folklore.' (2) According to Keith Thomas, for example, witches in early modern England tended to be poor women whose lives were maintained by traditional neighbourly customs often more observed in the breech than in the keeping in seventeenth-century England (see Religion and the Decline of Magic (New York, 1971), 561-6).
The most famous witches in English literature are the Three Weird Sisters, whose prophecies concerning Macbeth started him on his ambitious and tragic course.
Macbeth's "fiend-like Queen" may have once "given suck" but, following the Weird Sisters' prophesies, the only offspring of this union are apparitions of a bloody child and child crowned, symbolic of a "dead-end" succession.
Perhaps it's the overplayed Iraq connection, but as the three "weird sisters" stalk the stage in faded camouflage uniforms, their presence is robbed of the creepy supernatural element that can get "Macbeth" off to such a chilling start.
Hooded and veiled, these weird sisters were cloaked more in ambiguity than wild attire.