welcomer


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.
Related to welcomer: greeter

wel·come

 (wĕl′kəm)
adj.
1. Received with pleasure and hospitality into one's company or home: a welcome guest.
2. Giving pleasure or satisfaction; agreeable or gratifying: a welcome respite from hard work.
3. Cordially or willingly permitted or invited: You are welcome to join us.
4. Used in the expression you're welcome to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
n.
1. A cordial greeting or hospitable reception given to an arriving person.
2. A reception upon arrival: gave the stranger an unfriendly welcome.
3. The state of being welcome: Don't overstay your welcome.
tr.v. wel·comed, wel·com·ing, wel·comes
1. To greet, receive, or entertain (another or others) cordially or hospitably.
2. To receive or accept gladly: would welcome a little privacy.
interj.
Used to greet cordially a visitor or recent arrival.
Idiom:
wear out (one's) welcome
To visit so often or stay so long as to become a nuisance.

[Middle English, alteration (influenced by wel, well) of Old English wilcuma, welcome guest, welcome; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

wel′come·ly adv.
wel′come·ness n.
wel′com·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.welcomer - a person who greetswelcomer - a person who greets; "the newcomers were met by smiling greeters"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
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References in classic literature ?
"It was an hour after sunup that I heard the boys coming, and recognized the hoof-beats of Pomp and Caesar and Jerry, old mates of mine; and a welcomer sound there couldn't ever be.
"I am thankful I have lived long enough to be with Sir Leicester in this illness and trouble, for I know I am not too old nor too useless to be a welcomer sight to him than anybody else in my place would be.
Then, the narcissus is "croeso'r gwanwyn" (Spring welcomer) and the great reed mace or bulrush is variously called "cynffon y gath" (cat's tail), "ffon y plant" (children's stick) or "penmelfed" (velvet head), when its very soft seed-heads are present.
When individuals are seriously concerned about the environment (i.e., believe that the environment is being severely abused by humans and that the balance of nature is extremely delicate; Cordano, Welcomer, Scherer, Pradenas, & Parada, 2010; Stern et al., 1999), they are more likely to travel proenvironmentally, for instance, engaging in recycling and natural-local-resources-conservation behavior when traveling.
Amar, F., Haggerty, M., Ladenheim, M., Silka, L., Welcomer, S., & Jemison, J.
Visit www.changeworknow.co.uk Volunteer Ward Welcomer, North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust "We are looking for caring and passionate people who want to make a difference to join our organisation.
An accustomed dawn welcomer, Emily had often attended a club night called Legends of the Dark Black in Plymouth, which she describes as a 90s style rave.
Nothing could have been welcomer this day than such a torrential downpour.
Volunteer in this critical ministry as a Coordinator and/or a "welcomer" in an 8-week welcoming, compassionate program that provides easy-to-follow materials.
He has become one of Australia's most iconic go-betweens with a reputation for moving seamlessly between his own world and that of the newcomers, and his role as 'welcomer of ships' to Port Jackson has been the topic of much discussion.