weld


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weld 1

 (wĕld)
v. weld·ed, weld·ing, welds
v.tr.
1. To join (metals) by applying heat, sometimes with pressure and sometimes with an intermediate or filler metal having a high melting point.
2. To bring into close association or union.
v.intr.
To be capable of being welded.
n.
1. The union of two metal parts by welding.
2. The joint formed by welding.

[Alteration (probably influenced by welled, past participle of well) of well, to weld (obsolete and dialectal).]

weld 2

 (wĕld) also wold (wōld)
n.
2. The yellow dye obtained from dyer's rocket.

[Middle English welde.]

weld

(wɛld)
vb
1. (Metallurgy) (tr) to unite (pieces of metal or plastic) together, as by softening with heat and hammering or by fusion
2. to bring or admit of being brought into close association or union
n
(Metallurgy) a joint formed by welding
[C16: variant probably based on past participle of well2 in obsolete sense to boil, heat]
ˈweldable adj
ˌweldaˈbility n
ˈwelder, ˈweldor n
ˈweldless adj

weld

(wɛld) ,

wold

or

woald

n
1. (Dyeing) a yellow dye obtained from the plant dyer's rocket
2. (Plants) another name for dyer's rocket
[C14: from Low German; compare Middle Low German walde, waude, Dutch wouw]

Weld

(wɛld)
n
(Biography) Sir Frederick Aloysius. 1823–91, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1864–65)

weld

(wɛld)

v.t.
1. to unite or fuse (pieces, as of metal or plastic) by hammering, compressing, or the like, esp. after rendering soft or pasty by heat.
2. to bring into complete union, agreement, etc.
v.i.
3. to undergo welding; be capable of being welded.
n.
4. a welded junction or joint.
5. the act of welding or the state of being welded.
[1590–1600; variant of well2 in obsolete sense “to boil, weld”]
weld′er, wel′dor, n.

weld


Past participle: welded
Gerund: welding

Imperative
weld
weld
Present
I weld
you weld
he/she/it welds
we weld
you weld
they weld
Preterite
I welded
you welded
he/she/it welded
we welded
you welded
they welded
Present Continuous
I am welding
you are welding
he/she/it is welding
we are welding
you are welding
they are welding
Present Perfect
I have welded
you have welded
he/she/it has welded
we have welded
you have welded
they have welded
Past Continuous
I was welding
you were welding
he/she/it was welding
we were welding
you were welding
they were welding
Past Perfect
I had welded
you had welded
he/she/it had welded
we had welded
you had welded
they had welded
Future
I will weld
you will weld
he/she/it will weld
we will weld
you will weld
they will weld
Future Perfect
I will have welded
you will have welded
he/she/it will have welded
we will have welded
you will have welded
they will have welded
Future Continuous
I will be welding
you will be welding
he/she/it will be welding
we will be welding
you will be welding
they will be welding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been welding
you have been welding
he/she/it has been welding
we have been welding
you have been welding
they have been welding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been welding
you will have been welding
he/she/it will have been welding
we will have been welding
you will have been welding
they will have been welding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been welding
you had been welding
he/she/it had been welding
we had been welding
you had been welding
they had been welding
Conditional
I would weld
you would weld
he/she/it would weld
we would weld
you would weld
they would weld
Past Conditional
I would have welded
you would have welded
he/she/it would have welded
we would have welded
you would have welded
they would have welded

Weld

When blacksmiths were plying their trade, welding was not by electric arc or acetylene torch. The two pieces of iron were heated in a forge, and then beat on an anvil until they stuck (were welded) together.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Weld - European mignonette cultivated as a source of yellow dyeweld - European mignonette cultivated as a source of yellow dye; naturalized in North America
genus Reseda - Old World genus of herbs having racemose flowers: mignonette; dyer's rocket
reseda - any plant of the genus Reseda
2.Weld - United States abolitionist (1803-1895)
3.Weld - a metal joint formed by softening with heat and fusing or hammering togetherweld - a metal joint formed by softening with heat and fusing or hammering together
joint - junction by which parts or objects are joined together
spot weld, spot-weld - each of the welds made by welding at a separate point
Verb1.Weld - join together by heatingweld - join together by heating; "weld metal"
conjoin, join - make contact or come together; "The two roads join here"
spotweld, spot-weld - make circular welds; "These pipes are only spotwelded"
buttweld, butt-weld - join by a butt weld
2.weld - unite closely or intimately; "Her gratitude welded her to him"
merge, unify, unite - join or combine; "We merged our resources"

weld

verb
1. join, link, bond, bind, connect, cement, fuse, solder, braze It's possible to weld stainless steel to ordinary steel.
2. unite, combine, blend, consolidate, unify, fuse, meld The miracle was that Rose had welded them into a team.
noun
1. joint, bond, seam, juncture The weld on the outlet pipe was visibly fractured.
Translations
لَحْم، لِحاميَلْحِم
svejsesvejsning
hegesztmeghegeszt
logsuîa; logsoîin/lóîuî samskeytilóîa, logsjóîa, rafsjóîa
suvirinimo siūlėsuvirintojasvirinti
metinātmetināta šuve
zvarzvárať
kaynakkaynak yapmak

weld

[weld]
A. Nsoldadura f
B. VT (Tech) → soldar
the hull is welded throughoutel casco es totalmente soldado
to weld together (lit) → soldar (fig) → unir, unificar
to weld parts togethersoldar unas piezas
we must weld them together into a new bodyhemos de unirlos or unificarlos para formar un nuevo organismo
C. VIsoldarse

weld

[ˈwɛld]
nsoudure f
vtsouder
to weld sth to sth → souder qch à qch

weld

vt
(Tech) → schweißen; to weld parts togetherTeile zusammenschweißen or verschweißen; to weld something onetw anschweißen (→ to an +acc); welded jointSchweißnaht f
(fig: also weld together) → zusammenschmieden (into zu)
vischweißen

weld

[wɛld]
1. vtsaldare
2. nsaldatura

weld

(weld) verb
to join (pieces of metal) by pressure, often using heat, electricity etc.
noun
a joint made by welding.
ˈwelder noun
References in classic literature ?
In the next morning's paper I saw a little news item, and the last sentence of it may help you (as it helped me) to weld the incidents together.
Weld close the bars, and let them fret their hero lives away within the narrow cage.
He could never weld the warring factions of the disrupted federation.
This science they carry to considerable perfection, of which a good example is to be seen in their "tollas," or heavy throwing knives, the backs of these weapons being made of hammered iron, and the edges of beautiful steel welded with great skill on to the iron frames.
It is when in this condition that he strips away the husks of life's healthiest illusions and gravely considers the iron collar of necessity welded about the neck of his soul.
And if at times these things bent the welded iron of his soul, much more did his far-away domestic memories of his young Cape wife and child, tend to bend him still more from the original ruggedness of his nature, and open him still further to those latent influences which, in some honest-hearted men, restrain the gush of dare-devil daring, so often evinced by others in the more perilous vicissitudes of the fishery.
Not at all, but I have ye; for at the time poor Tash fell in, the case had been nearly emptied of its lighter contents, leaving little but the dense tendinous wall of the well --a double welded, hammered substance, as I have before said, much heavier than the sea water, and a lump of which sinks in it like lead almost.
The sky of the westerly weather is full of flying clouds, of great big white clouds coming thicker and thicker till they seem to stand welded into a solid canopy, upon whose gray face the lower wrack of the gale, thin, black and angry-looking, flies past with vertiginous speed.
Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures (whatever we may mean by that canting expression) are never welded. The base one goes on being base, and the noble one noble, to the end.
It had welded into one compact political mass the whole of North America from the Panama Canal to the Arctic Ocean.
If boys and men are to be welded together in the glow of transient feeling, they must be made of metal that will mix, else they inevitably fall asunder when the heat dies out.
Ere they departed, the family was welded once more into a fair semblance of unity.